Get mine now
Star Star Star Star

Rated 4.9/5 From 1000+ Reviews

Ashwagandha Withania Somnifera - KSM-66 Ashwagandha

Product Image
Product Image

Ashwagandha Withania Somnifera - KSM-66 Ashwagandha

Improve your stress levels, sleep, anxiety, mood and sexual function...

Natural Ashwagandha

£59.97
£39.99
£39.99
Star SAVE  £19.98

1. Number Of Capsules

Frequently bought with

Get it by

Ashwagandha is suitable for you if you tick any of these boxes:

  • You want help improving stress and anxiety levels
  • You want to improve sleep quality
As Seen On

NUMEROUS SCIENTIFIC STUDIES HAVE OBSERVED IMPROVEMENTS IN STRESS LEVELS, SLEEP, ANXIETY, MOOD, TESTOSTERONE LEVELS, FERTILITY AND INFLAMMATION AFTER ASHWAGANDHA SUPPLEMENTATION

STRESS AND ANXIETY

Ashwagandha is widely taken to help reduce stress and anxiety levels. Several clinical trials have found associations between ashwagandha supplementation and anti-anxiety and stress-relieving effects. Participants in these studies reported lower stress, depression and anxiety. Participants have also exhibited lower levels of DHEA and cortisol which can indicate an improved response to stress.

Image

SLEEP

Clinical trials have observed improved sleep latency (the time it takes to fall asleep), total sleep time, sleep efficiency (the percentage of time spent asleep while in bed), and sleep quality.

Image

SEXUAL FUNCTION

Scientific research has found significant associations between ashwagandha supplementation and improvements in sexual satisfaction and hormone levels. Women have reported improved lubrication, orgasm, and sexual distress. Males have reported improved sexual drive and arousal. Researchers have observed higher levels of testosterone in men, as well as improved sperm quality.

Image

SAFE AND NATURAL

Ashwagandha is a plant native to the dry regions of India, North Africa and the Middle East. The root and leaves of the plant are primarily used for their therapeutic properties, as they contain bioactive compounds such as withanolides, which are believed to provide numerous health benefits. Ashwagandha supplements have been safely tested in dozens of clinical trials.

Image
Star Star Star Star Star

Rated 4.9/5 From 1000+ Reviews

Get mine now
image description

How to use

  • image description

    ONE PER DAy

    Take one 500mg capsule daily, ideally in the morning.

  • image description

    WITH OR WITHOUT FOOD

    Ashwagandha can be taken with food or on an empty stomach. However, the impact of food on supplement absorption is often unpredictable as different compounds within food can interact with the supplement in different ways.

Scientific Studies

Several studies have investigated the effects of ashwagandha. We have summarised the most interesting results.

Participant questionnaires reported improvements in mental health, vitality, social functioning and general health.
Participants

75 male and female employees diagnosed with moderate to severe anxiety

Study Length

12 Weeks

doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0006628
Improvements in all sleep parameters after Ashwagandha supplementation. This includes sleep onset latency (the time it takes to fall asleep), total sleep time, wake after sleep onset (the duration of wakefulness during the sleep period), time in bed, and sleep efficiency (the percentage of time spent asleep while in bed).
Participants

80 participants with an average age of 37

Study Length

8 Weeks

doi: 10.1016/j.jep.2020.113276
Significant improvements in lower-body and upper-body strength after 12 weeks of Ashwagandha supplementation.
Participants

40 males with an average age of 26

Study Length

12 Weeks

doi: 10.3390/nu10111807
Significant increases in sperm concentration, semen volume and sperm motility after 90 days of Ashwagandha supplementation.
Participants

46 infertile male patients aged 22-40

Study Length

90 Days

doi: 10.1155/2013/571420
Significant increase in serum T3 and T4 levels after 8 weeks of Ashwagandha supplementation.
Participants

50 males and females with subclinical hypothyroidism, aged 18-50

Study Length

8 Weeks

doi: 10.1089/acm.2017.0183

If you wish to read every scientific study in more detail, check out our scientific studies database.

Scientific Studies

Numerous clinical trials have investigated the effects of ashwagandha in humans. We have summarised some of the most important studies related to anxiety, stress, sleep, mood, testosterone, sexual function, muscle strength, energy, immune system, oxidative stress, joint health, hypothyroidism, and tuberculosis.

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha root extract in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism.

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 300 mg capsules containing 5% withanolides) or placebo

Participants:

50 males and females with subclinical hypothyroidism, compared to baseline aged 18-50 years

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

Supplementation with ashwagandha root extract for 4 and 8 weeks was associated with a significant increase in serum T3 levels, indicating higher concentrations of this thyroid hormone in the bloodstream. The placebo group, on the other hand, experienced a decrease in serum T3 levels over time. Similarly, ashwagandha treatment was associated with a significant increase in serum T4 concentrations at both the fourth and eighth weeks. T3 and T4 are important hormones for regulating metabolism and energy production in the body. Furthermore, the ashwagandha group exhibited a significant decrease in serum TSH levels compared to the placebo group. A decrease in TSH suggests improved thyroid function and a more balanced production of thyroid hormones. Overall, these findings indicate that ashwagandha supplementation may have positive effects on thyroid hormone levels in individuals with subclinical hypothyroidism.

Year:

2018

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1089/acm.2017.0183

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind parallel-group, placebo-controlled study

Purpose:

To compare the effects of ashwagandha root extract between healthy subjects and in subjects with insomnia.

Method of Evaluation:

Sleep parameters were assessed using actigraphy, a non-invasive method of monitoring human rest and activity cycles such as sleep onset latency, total sleep time, wake after sleep onset, total time in bed, and sleep efficiency. In addition, sleep quality was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire, which measured subjective sleep quality.

Anxiety was self-assessed using a psychological questionnaire which measured the severity of perceived anxiety.

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 300  mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

80 participants with an average age of 37 years

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The researchers observed significant improvements in all sleep parameters, including sleep onset latency (the time it takes to fall asleep), total sleep time, wake after sleep onset (the duration of wakefulness during the sleep period), time in bed, and sleep efficiency (the percentage of time spent asleep while in bed). The improvements were more notable in individuals with insomnia compared to healthy subjects, suggesting that ashwagandha treatment may have a greater impact on improving sleep in those with existing sleep difficulties. Moreover, improvements in subjective sleep quality were observed for both the ashwagandha group in the healthy study population and the insomnia study group.

Additionally, the researchers also noticed a notable reduction in anxiety symptoms among individuals with insomnia who received the ashwagandha supplement.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2020.113276

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial

Purpose:

To determine the effects of ashwagandha root extract in patients with insomnia and anxiety.

Method of Evaluation:

Sleep onset latency and other sleep parameters were assessed by actigraphy,  a non-invasive technique used to get an objective measurement of your sleep schedule. Sleep quality was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire and sleep logs which evaluated mental alertness on rising and quality of sleep.

Anxiety was assessed using a self-reported questionnaire which measured mental agitation, psychological distress, and physical complaints related to anxiety. 

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 300 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

60 males and females aged 18-60 years.

Duration:

10 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between ashwagandha treatment and the significantly shorter sleep onset latency after 10 weeks. The researchers also observed significant improvements in other sleep parameters including total sleep time, sleep efficiency and sleep quality.  Furthermore, ashwagandha treatment was associated with lower anxiety levels after 10 weeks of ashwagandha treatment.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.5797

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To compare the effect of ashwagandha and guduchi on oxidative stress in healthy volunteers

Dose:

1,000 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 500 mg capsules) or 1,000 mg/day guduchi (2 x 500 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

30 males and females aged 18-45 years

Duration:

6 months

Results:

The study found that ashwagandha treatment was associated with increased haemoglobin levels. Higher levels of haemoglobin can indicate factors such as improved oxygenation and increased red blood cell production. Additionally, the researchers observed a significant increase in the level of superoxide dismutase and a decrease in the level of malondialdehyde. An increase in superoxide dismutase levels, as observed in the study, suggests that the body's antioxidant defence system is enhanced. It indicates a potential improvement in the body's ability to cope with oxidative stress. In contrast, a decrease in malondialdehyde levels reflects a decrease in the harmful effects of oxidative stress. 

No adverse effects were found in the trial period of 6 months.

Year:

2014

Link:

https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-8520.141919

Study 1

Study type: 

Pragmatic randomised controlled trial

Purpose:

To compare the effects of ashwagandha treatment with a standardised psychotherapy on employees with moderate to severe anxiety.

Method of evaluation:

Anxiety levels were assessed using a self-reported questionnaire which measured subjective symptoms of anxiety. Quality of life was also assessed using questionnaires which measured health-related quality of life, physical and mental fatigue, and qualitative patient experiences.

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 300 mg) or placebo

Additional interventions:

In addition to the ashwagandha treatment, participants in the naturopathic care group received an adult multivitamin, lifestyle and nutritional counselling, and engaged in diaphragmatic deep breathing exercises during their treatment sessions.

Participants in the control group received 12 weeks of psychotherapy sessions targeting anxiety, consisting of patient-directed counselling and cognitive-behavioural therapy, along with placebo pills. 

Participants:

75 male and female employees with moderate to severe anxiety 

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

The study found a significant association between naturopathic treatment, which included dietary changes and daily intake of 600 mg of ashwagandha,  and a reduction in anxiety symptoms. Additionally, the researchers observed that the naturopathic group experienced better outcomes in terms of fatigue, motivation, concentration, and overall well-being compared to the psychotherapy group. Patient-centred assessments also revealed significant reductions in specific symptoms and improvements in mental health, vitality, social functioning, and general health in the naturopathic group.

Year:

2009

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0006628

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the stress-relieving and pharmacological activity of ashwagandha extract in stressed adults.

Method of Evaluation:

Anxiety, depression, and stress were assessed using both clinician-administered and self-reported questionnaires, which measured the severity of anxiety, stress, and depression.

Dose:

240 mg/day of standardised ashwagandha extract containing 35% withanolides or placebo 

Participants:

60 males and females aged 18 to 65 years

Duration:

60 days

Results:

The study found an association between ashwagandha supplementation and a statistically significant reduction in anxiety symptoms, as measured by Hamilton Anxiety Scale when compared to the placebo. Additionally, a notable but not statistically significant decrease in symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress, as measured by the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale-21, was observed. Moreover, ashwagandha supplementation was linked to greater reductions in morning cortisol levels, a hormone associated with stress, as well as dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) levels, a hormone involved in hormone production, compared to the placebo. Reductions of DHEA along with morning cortisol levels may be a marker of decreased stress. The researchers also observed an increase in testosterone levels increased in males but not in females over time, although this change was not statistically significant compared with the placebo.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1097/MD.0000000000017186

Study 3

Study type: 

Randomised, placebo-controlled, between-group trial

Purpose:

To assess the effects of ashwagandha on improving cognitive performance, mood, anxiety, food cravings, and cortisol levels in healthy adults with high perceived stress.

Method of Evaluation: 

Anxiety, depression, and stress were assessed using self-reported questionnaires which measured trait anxiety levels, magnitude of depression, anxiety, and perceived stress.

Cognitive ability was assessed using a neurocognitive test which measured verbal memory, visual memory, finger tapping, digit coding, stroop test, attention, and performance.

Dose:

225 mg/day of ashwagandha root and leaf extract or 400 mg/day of ashwagandha root and leaf extract or placebo 

Participants:

60 healthy men and women with an average age of 34 years

Duration:

30 days

Results:

The researchers observed significant improvements over time in self-report assessments for anxiety, stress, depression, perceived stress, and food cravings. However, these improvements were not specific to the intervention group, as the main effect for the group and interactions were not significant. Additionally, significant improvements were observed in cognitive flexibility, visual memory, reaction time, psychomotor speed, and executive functioning, with the Ashwagandha groups often out-performing the placebo group. Cortisol levels in the ashwagandha groups also exhibited reductions, with larger effects observed in the 225 mg/day ashwagandha group. In contrast, the placebo group showed a nonsignificant increase in cortisol levels. Increased cortisol levels in short term can enhance the body's ability to respond to stressors by providing a burst of energy, heightened focus, and increased alertness.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaim.2021.08.003

Study 4

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of an aqueous ashwagandha root extract in reducing stress and anxiety in adults.

Method of Evaluation:

Anxiety was assessed using a clinician-based psychological questionnaire which measures intensity of anxiety. Stress and quality of sleep was assessed using self-reported questionnaires which measure perceived stress, and overall sleep quality. 

Dose:

250 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 125 mg capsules) or 600 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 300 mg capsules) or placebo 

Participants:

60 male and female participants 

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The researchers observed that the group taking 600 mg of ashwagandha showed significant reductions in stress and anxiety levels, as well as significant improvement in sleep quality compared to the placebo group. Relative to the value at baseline, there was a statistically significant reduction in the mean serum cortisol level in both the 250mg and 600mg ashwagandha groups compared to the placebo group. Lower levels of cortisol indicate a decrease in stress response within the body. Researchers observed a statistically significant reduction in the stress levels in both treatment groups.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.7759/cureus.6466

Study 5

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha root extract on patients with generalised anxiety disorder.

Method of evaluation:

Anxiety was assessed using a clinician-based questionnaire which measured the severity of generalised anxiety disorder.

Dose:

1 g/day of ashwagandha or placebo 

Participants:

40 patients with a confirmed diagnosis of generalised anxiety disorder

Duration:

Six weeks

Results:

The study found an association between a daily dose of 1g ashwagandha oral intake and greater reduction in anxiety rating scores. The researchers observed a 14-unit reduction in anxiety scores in the ashwagandha group. In contrast, an 8-unit reduction was observed in the placebo group after six weeks of treatment.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.2174/1574884715666200413120413

Study 6

Study type:

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha extract in patients with anxiety disorders.

Method of Evaluation:

Anxiety was assessed using the Hamilton Anxiety Scale, a clinician-based questionnaire used to measure the severity of anxiety. 

Dose:

500 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 250 mg tablets) or placebo

Participants:

39 men and women with an average age of 41

Duration:

6 weeks

Results:

The study found a trend for superior anti-anxiety effects of Ashwagandha over the placebo at week 2, and statistically significant superior anti-anxiety effects at week 6.

Ashwagandha was well tolerated and adverse effects were comparable to those observed after the placebo.

Year:

2000

Link:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21407960/

Study 7

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To assess the effects of a standardised extract of ashwagandha in patients with bipolar disorder.

Method of Evaluation:

Cognitive function was assessed using various cognitive assessments that measure executive functions, processing speed, attention/working memory, memory, psychomotor speed, and social cognition.

Dose:

250 mg/day of ashwagandha extract on the first week and 500 mg/day (2 x 250 mg capsules) for the next 7 weeks or placebo

Participants:

60 males and females diagnosed with bipolar disorder

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The study revealed a significant association between ashwagandha extract and notable improvements in specific cognitive tasks after an 8-week treatment period. These tasks included remembering numbers in reverse order, responding quickly to neutral stimuli, and accurately identifying emotions.

Reported adverse events were mild and temporary (5 participants reported diarrhoea and 3 participants reported sleepiness). No participants withdrew from the study or experienced serious adverse events.

Year:

2013

Link:

https://doi.org/10.4088/JCP.13m08413

Study 8

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ashwagandha root extract in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

Method of Evaluation:

Obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms were assessed using the Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale, a symptom checklist which measures the frequency and severity of the symptoms in OCD patients.

Dose:

120 mg/day of ashwagandha (4 x 30 mg of ashwagandha extract) or placebo

Participants:

30 patients diagnosed with obsessive-compulsive disorder and undergoing treatment with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRI) drugs at an adequate dose and duration.

Duration:

6 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between daily oral supplementation of 120 mg of ashwagandha and significantly greater reduction in obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms. The researchers observed an 8-unit reduction in obsessive-compulsive disorder symptoms in the treatment group, while the placebo group only had a 2-unit reduction.

Year:

2016

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ctim.2016.03.018

 

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To assess the effects of ashwagandha root extract on sperm production in patients with oligospermia, or low sperm count.

Dose:

675 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (3 x 225 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

46 infertile male patients aged 22-40 years 

Duration:

90 days

Results:

The study found an association between ashwagandha treatment and significant increases in sperm concentration, semen volume, and sperm motility. Additionally, the researchers observed a 17% increase in serum testosterone and a 34% increase in luteinizing hormone following treatment with ashwagandha root extract compared to the baseline. In males, an increase in luteinizing hormone stimulates the production of testosterone in the testes.

Year:

2013

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2013/571420

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ashwagandha on seminal plasma metabolites in infertile men.

Dose:

5 g/day of ashwagandha root powder or placebo

Participants:

180 infertile men in the treatment group and 50 normal healthy fertile men in the control group. Within the treatment group, there were three subgroups of infertile males: 60 men with normal semen parameters but an unknown cause of infertility (normozoospermic), 60 men with low sperm concentration (oligozoospermic), and 60 men with poor sperm motility (asthenozoospermic).

Duration:

3 months

Results:

The study found that ashwagandha treatment was associated with significant increases in the concentrations of alanine, glutamate, citrate, glycerophosphocholine, and histidine, and a decrease in phenylalanine in the normozoospermic group. Similar findings were observed in the oligozoospermic and asthenozoospermic groups after three months of ashwagandha treatment. These improvements in alanine, glutamate, citrate, GPC, and histidine indicate positive effects on male fertility, as these substances are important biomarkers. Additionally, the decrease in phenylalanine suggests potential improvements in overall health and metabolic profile among men.

Year:

2013

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2013.06.024

Study 3

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ashwagandha supplementation in overweight men with mild-to-moderate, self-reported fatigue.

Method of Evaluation: 

Symptomatic changes and mood states were assessed using self-reported questionnaires which measured psychological, somatic, and sexual symptoms, and fatigue inertia and vigour-activity. 

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha extract (2 x 300 mg capsules with 10.5 mg of of withanolide glycosides) or placebo

Participants:

57 overweight males with mild-to-moderate symptoms of fatigue aged 40-70 years

Duration:

16 weeks

Results:

The researchers observed significant improvements in most symptom scores from baseline to week 8 for both the placebo and ashwagandha conditions. In the placebo group, improvements were observed in psychological, somatic, and sexual symptoms, as well as fatigue-inertia and vigour-activity. Similar improvements were found in the ashwagandha group, except for fatigue-inertia scores which did not show significant improvement. The study also found that daily supplementation of 600 mg ashwagandha was associated with an 18% higher increase in salivary dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) and a 14.7% higher increase in testosterone compared to the placebo group. Higher concentrations of DHEA-S are associated with improvements in mood and reductions in fatigue.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1177/1557988319835985

Study 4

Study type: 

Triple-blind, randomised clinical trial

Purpose:

To compare the effects of ashwagandha and pentoxifylline on sperm parameters in idiopathic male infertility.

Dose:

5 g/day of ashwagandha extract (6 x 0.83 g capsules) or 800 mg/day of pentoxifylline (6 x 133.33 mg capsules) and placebo

Participants:

100 infertile male patients with an average age of 34 years old

Duration:

90 days

Results:

The researchers observed a significant increase of 12.5% in average sperm count, 21.42% in progressive motility, and 25.56% improvement in sperm morphology with ashwagandha supplementation compared to baseline measurements. Similarly, a significant increase of 16.46% in average semen volume, 25.97% in progressive motility, and 13.28% improvement in sperm morphology compared to baseline was observed with pentoxifylline. However, no statistical differences were found between the treatment groups.

Year:

2018

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1111/and.13041

Study 5

Study type: 

Randomised clinical trial (uncontrolled)

Purpose:

To explore the potential protective effects of ashwagandha in infertile men who were either experiencing psychological stress or were smokers.

Dose:

5 g/day of ashwagandha root powder with a cup of skimmed milk

Participants:

121 men, aged 25-38 years

Duration:

3 months

Results:

The study found an association between ashwagandha treatment and improved semen parameters in men. The researchers observed a 17% increase of sperm concentration in men with normal sperm parameters (normozoospermic), 20% in cigarette smokers, and 36% in men experiencing psychological stress. The movement of sperm also improved by 9%, 10%, and 13% in the respective groups  along with decrease in their semen liquefaction time by 19, 20 and 34%, as compared with the pretreatment parameters. A decrease in semen liquefaction time improves the chances of successful fertilisation.

In addition, the researchers examined the pregnancy outcomes of the men's partners and observed a 15% success rate for men with normal sperm parameters, 15% for men experiencing psychological stress, and 10% for cigarette smokers, leading to an overall success rate of 14%.

Year:

2009

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1093/ecam/nep138

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha root extract on sexual performance and well-being in adult males.

Method of Evaluation:

Sexual activity and quality of sexual function were assessed using a self-reported questionnaire which included questions related to sexual cognition/fantasy, sexual arousal, sexual behaviour/experiences, orgasm, and drive/desire. Quality of life was also assessed using a self-reported questionnaire that evaluated physical functioning, emotional well-being, pain, energy, and fatigue.

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 300 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

50 healthy males aged 21-45 years

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

Participants who took the ashwagandha root extract had an 88.5% greater probability of scoring higher on questionnaires about their sexual activity and quality of sexual function. Additionally, the researchers observed a 17% rise in serum testosterone in the ashwagandha group, while the placebo group only had a 2% change. Participants in the ashwagandha group also showed slight improvement and stability in quality of life parameters compared to the placebo group, although there were no statistically significant improvements observed for either group.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1002/hsr2.741

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ashwagandha root extract supplementation on improving sexual function in healthy females.

Method of Evaluation:

Female sexual function was assessed using self-reported questionnaires which measured sexual desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, pain, distress, and sexual activity. 

Dose:

600 mg/day of high-concentration ashwagandha root extract (2 x 300 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

50 women aged 21-50 years

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between high-concentration ashwagandha root extract supplementation and a significant increase in female sexual function. Specifically, improvements were observed in lubrication, orgasm, and sexual distress. The average number of successful sexual encounters also showed a significant increase, with a 96% improvement at week 4 and a 126% improvement at week 8, compared to the 59-61% increase observed in the placebo group.

Year:

2015

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2015/284154

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha root extract on climacteric symptoms, quality of life, and hormonal parameters in perimenopausal women.

Method of Evaluation:

Menopausal symptoms were assessed using self-reported questionnaires, which measured the severity of menopausal symptoms and their impact on various aspects of a woman's life, including vasomotor symptoms (hot flashes), psychosocial, physical, and sexual symptoms.

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 300 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

100 women with climacteric symptoms

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between 600 mg of ashwagandha daily intake and improvement in menopause-specific quality of life. Additionally, the researchers observed a significant increase in serum estradiol. An increase in serum estradiol levels can have several implications, such as supporting reproductive health, promoting bone density, and influencing mood and cognitive function.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1111/jog.15030

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha root extract on cardiorespiratory endurance in healthy athletic adults.

Method of Evaluation:

Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed using Cooper’s 12-minute run test which measured  maximum oxygen consumption (VO₂  max).

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 300 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

50 healthy athletic adults with an average age of 29 years

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between ashwagandha supplementation and statistically significant improvements in antioxidant levels and VO₂ max compared to the placebo group. Higher values of VO₂ max indicate better aerobic fitness. 

In addition, the researchers observed significant improvements in various assessments of recovery, well-being, and performance in the ashwagandha group compared to the placebo group. The TQR (Total Quality Recovery)  scores indicated better overall recovery and well-being in the Ashwagandha group. The DALDA (Daily Analysis of Life Demands for Athletes) scores, which measures different aspects of performance, also favoured the ashwagandha group. The RESTQ (Recovery-Stress Questionnaire for Athletes) assessment showed better outcomes in terms of fatigue recovery, lack of energy, and fitness analysis in the ashwagandha group.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2021.113929

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, controlled, parallel group, single-blinded trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ashwagandha and terminalia arjuna, both individually and in combination, on physical and cardiovascular performance in healthy young adults.

Dose:

500 mg/day of ashwagandha and/or 500 mg/day of Terminalia arjuna or placebo

Participants:

40 healthy males and females with an average age of 21 years

Duration:

8 weeks 

Results:

The researchers observed significant improvements in velocity, power, and maximal aerobic capacity (VO₂ max)  in participants taking ashwagandha, while those who took Terminalia arjuna had increased VO₂ max and lower resting systolic blood pressure. VO₂ max  is a measure of the body's oxygen usage during exercise and higher values indicate better fitness. In addition, a lower resting systolic blood pressure is generally considered beneficial for cardiovascular health. When the two supplements were administered together, improvements were seen in all physical performance and endurance parameters except balance and diastolic blood pressure.

Year:

2010

Link:

https://doi.org/10.4103/0974-7788.72485  

Study 3

Study type: 

Randomised, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ashwagandha supplementation in enhancing the aerobic performance of elite Indian cyclists.

Method of Evaluation: 

Aerobic capacity in terms of maximal aerobic capacity (VO₂ max), metabolic equivalent, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), and total time for the athlete to reach his exhaustion stage was determined during a treadmill test in which subjects were asked to perform till volitional exhaustion.

Dose:

1,000 mg/day of Ashwagandha (2 x 500 mg capsules) or a placebo 

Participants:

40 elite Indian cyclists aged 18-27 years

Duration:

8 weeks 

Results:

The study found a significant association between ashwagandha treatment and improvements in all parameters related to aerobic capacity, such as VO₂ max, metabolic equivalents of tasks (METs), and time to exhaustion on the treadmill.These findings indicate that ashwagandha supplementation can enhance endurance and cardiovascular fitness. VO₂ max measures the body's maximum ability to utilise oxygen during intense exercise, and higher values indicate better aerobic fitness. METs, on the other hand, provide a measure of the intensity of physical activity, and improvements in METs suggest increased aerobic performance and overall fitness levels.

Year:

2012

Link:

https://doi.org/10.4103/0975-9476.104444

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of a standardised ashwagandha (Sensoril) root and leaf extract on strength training adaptations and recovery.

Method of Evaluation:

Muscular strength was measured through one-repetition bench press and back squat using standard methods 

Dose:

500 mg/day of ashwagandha supplementation or placebo taken every morning with 12 fluid ounces of cold tap water

Additional interventions:

4 days/week resistance-training program designed to train the upper body and lower body

Participants:

40 males with an average age of 26 years

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

The study found that the daily dose of 500 mg ashwagandha extract, combined with a heavy resistance-training program is associated with the significant improvements in lower-body and upper-body strength after 12 weeks. Additionally, the researchers observed significant improvements in squat power, bench press power, 7.5 km time trial performance, and perceived recovery scores in the ashwagandha group  but not in placebo. 

Furthermore, no change in the android/gynoid ratio was observed in the ashwagandha group, whereas the placebo group experienced a significant increase in android/gynoid ratios. Higher android/gynoid ratios are associated with an increased risk of health conditions such as cardiovascular disease and metabolic disorders. 

Year:

2018

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu10111807

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, Prospective, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Clinical Trial

Purpose:

To examine the effects of ashwagandha root extract on muscle mass and strength in healthy young men engaged in resistance training.

Method of evaluation: 

Muscular strength was measured through one-repetition leg and bench press using standard methods.

Dose:

600 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 300 mg capsules with 5% withanolides) or placebo

Additional interventions:

Resistance training program in both upper body and lower body

Participants:

57 young males aged 18-50 years with little experience in resistance training

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The researchers observed significant improvements in muscle strength and size in both the ashwagandha group and placebo group, which can be expected with resistance training. However, the ashwagandha group showed significantly greater increases in muscle strength for both the upper and lower body compared to the placebo group. Additionally, the ashwagandha group experienced greater improvements in muscle size, muscle recovery, and a decrease in body fat percentage compared to the placebo group. The study also found an association between ashwagandha treatment and significantly greater increase in serum testosterone. 

Year:

2015

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12970-015-0104-9

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with an open-label extension  

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha extract in middle-aged healthy individuals exposed to environmental influences of seasonal change.

Dose:

180 mg/day capsule containing 60 mg of ashwagandha with 21 mg withanolides or placebo 

Participants:

24 healthy healthy men and women aged  45-72 years

Duration:

30 days and an open-label extension study for another 30 days

Results:

The study found an association between ashwagandha treatment and significant improvements in the participant’s immune system after 30 days.  They had higher levels of certain immune markers, such as antibodies (IgA, IgM, IgG), cytokines (IFN-γ, IL4), and different types of immune cells (TBNK cells). Higher levels of antibodies, cytokines, and immune cells indicate an enhanced immune response. In contrast, the group that received a placebo had a decrease in immune cells and no change in antibody levels or cytokines.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/jcm10163644

Study 1

Study type: 

Prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of ashwagandha root and leaf extracts in patients with knee joint pain and discomfort.

Method of Evaluation

Knee joint pain and discomfort were assessed using a self-administered questionnaire which measures pain, stiffness, and physical functional disability in patients with hip and knee osteoarthritis. 

Dose:

250 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 125 mg capsules) or 500 mg/day of ashwagandha (2 x 250 mg capsules) or placebo

Participants:

60 males and females with knee joint pain and discomfort with an average age of 58 years

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

The researchers observed that both daily doses of 250 mg and 500 mg of ashwagandha taken over a period of 12 weeks resulted in significant improvements in various measures of osteoarthritis, including the osteoarthritis index score (mWOMAC), knee swelling, pain, stiffness, and disability when compared to baseline and placebo. When comparing the two doses, the 500 mg daily dose of ashwagandha showed better outcomes. Additionally, the 500 mg/day dose showed earlier effects at 4 weeks compared to the 250 mg/day dose.

Year:

2016

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jaim.2016.05.003

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo control trial

Purpose:

To examine the impact of ashwagandha when used alongside a short course treatment in individuals newly diagnosed with sputum smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis.

Dose:

1000 mg/day of ashwagandha root extract (2 x 500 mg capsules) or placebo

Additional Interventions:

First line antitubercular drugs (drugs used to treat tuberculosis)

Participants:

60 newly diagnosed sputum smear-positive patients of pulmonary TB of category 1

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

After 8 weeks of treatment, the researchers observed sputum conversion (when the patient's sputum tests negative for the bacteria after a period of treatment) in 86.6% of patients taking ashwagandha as an adjuvant in conjunction with anti-TB drugs, compared to 76.6% in the placebo group. Sputum conversion is a positive response to treatment and indicates a reduction in the bacterial load in the respiratory system. The study also found an association between ashwagandha treatment and the significant increase in CD4 and CD8 counts.  An increase in CD4 and CD8 counts refers to an increase in the number of specific types of immune cells called T cells in the blood which may indicate that the immune system is successfully fighting the infection and working to control the disease.

In terms of liver function, a smaller percentage of patients in the ashwagandha group had increased levels of SGOT (serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase) and SGPT (serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase), which are enzymes that indicate liver health, compared to the placebo group. This is a positive result, as it shows that the treatment may be gentler on the liver.  Furthermore, elevated levels of serum uric acid (>6 mg/dl) were observed in 20% of patients in the study group and 33.33% in the placebo group. Elevated uric acid levels can sometimes indicate certain health issues.

Lastly, patients in the ashwagandha group reported a better overall improvement in their quality of life compared to the placebo group. 

Year:

2018

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijtb.2017.05.005

3rd Party Tests

To prove the quality of our supplements, we get them tested by 3rd-party laboratories. Most supplement companies do not get the quality of their supplements verified by 3rd-parties. This means their customers have to blindly trust claims of high quality. We’re different. Our supplements are 3rd-party tested for:

  • Heavy metals, confirming our supplements are among the lowest in heavy metals on the market

SEE WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)

Bundle Up

Buy a bundle and save!

Clock Want it dispatched today? Order within

Enjoy for as little as £0.16 per serving (without discount codes).

Bundle image
Ashwagandha 1 Month Supply

(30)

£19.99

Bundle image
Ashwagandha 3 Month Supply

90

£59.97 SAVE 33%

£39.99

Save £19.98
BUNDLE UP
Bundle image
Natural Steroid Cycle Bundle 1 Month Supply

2 Months / With Caffeine

£329.95 SAVE 49%

£249.99

Save £79.96
BEST VALUE

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Are there any side effects?

    The majority of clinical trials of ashwagandha have not observed adverse side effects. In rare cases, the supplement may cause diarrhoea or stomach irritation. To minimise this irritation, always take the supplement with meals. Avoid taking the supplement after heavy meals or consuming alcohol.

  • What scientific evidence is there that this works?

    The scientific research is shown above on this page. Scroll up to find it.