Get mine now
Star Star Star Star

Rated 4.9/5 From 1000+ Reviews

Reishi Capsules

Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image
Product Image

Reishi Capsules

£29.99
£29.99

1. Number Of Capsules

£29.99
£49.99 £59.98 SAVE £9.99
£79.99 £89.97 SAVE £9.98
£119.99 £179.94 SAVE £59.95
How many capsules in a 1 month supply?

There are 100 capsules in a 1 month supply (2-4 per day).

Frequently bought with

Get it by

What is reishi?

Reishi is a traditional medicinal mushroom that has been used for centuries in Eastern cultures for its potential health benefits.

image description

How to use

  • image description

    ONE TO FOUR CAPSULES PER DAY

    Take one to four 500mg capsules daily, ideally in the morning.

  • image description

    With or Without FOOD

    Reishi can be taken with food or on an empty stomach. However, the impact of food on supplement absorption is often unpredictable as different compounds within food can interact with the supplement in different ways.

    On the other hand, taking Reishi with food will slow absorption, which can be beneficial if you want the effects to kick in slower or if you experience nausea when taking the supplement on an empty stomach.

Scientific Studies

We have a database with tens of thousands of studies on the products we sell. Here we have summarised some of the most interesting studies related to Reishi.

Study 1

Study type: 

Systematic review

Purpose:

To explore the anti-neuroinflammatory activities of bioactive compounds from medicinal mushrooms, including reishi in various laboratory studies and animal studies. 

Results:

Various studies have shown that reishi mushroom extracts have anti-neuroinflammatory properties, meaning that they have properties that counteract inflammation in the brain and nervous system. Neuroinflammation plays a major role in Alzheimer's Disease, as well as Parkinson's Disease, brain ischemia, epilepsy and depression.

A study revealed that reishi extracts reduced levels of IL-8 and TNF-α, which are small proteins called cytokines that play a role in the immune response and inflammation within the hippocampus. The hippocampus is a region of the brain that is important for learning and memory, and is often affected in neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s. In the context of neuroinflammation, IL-8 and TNF-α can contribute to damage and degeneration of brain cells. Reduced levels of these cytokines suggests that the reishi extract has anti-inflammatory effects in the brain.

Another study found that reishi spore powder and lion’s mane extract had protective effects on neurons and the broader nervous system, (“neuroprotective” effects) and reduced neuronal apoptosis (reduced brain cell death) in animal models of epilepsy.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.tifs.2020.07.029

Study 2

Study type: 

Single case study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of self-medication with reishi on the symptoms of Parkinson's disease, a neurodegenerative disorder that primarily affects movement control. Parkinson's disease can also cause non-motor symptoms, including cognitive changes, depression, anxiety, sleep disturbances, and gastrointestinal issues.

Method of evaluation:

Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease were assessed using self-administered questionnaires which measure motor and behavioural aspects of the disease, quality-of-life, self-compassion, positive emotions, and multiple aspects of emotional dysregulation such as nonacceptance of emotional responses, difficulties engaging in goal-directed behaviour, impulse control difficulties, lack of emotional awareness, limited access to emotion regulation strategies, and lack of emotional clarity. 

Dose:

300 mg/day of reishi

Duration:

3 months

Results:

The patient reported an increase in mindfulness from “moderate” at the start of the study to “high” after 3 months of self-medication with reishi. Mindfulness is a mental state characterised by heightened awareness of the present moment, an open and non-judgmental attitude, and a focus on one's thoughts, sensations, and surroundings. In the context of Parkinson's disease, high mindfulness could imply that these patients are better able to cultivate and sustain these qualities, which may have positive effects on their overall well-being and symptom management.

The patient also reported moderate self-compassion scores throughout the study, with high scores for self-kindness, which can be an important aspect of coping with Parkinson's disease. 

Moreover, the patient's satisfaction with the treatment was rated with scores of 60% (Effectiveness), 100% (Convenience) and 85% (Overall Satisfaction).  The patient did not report any side effects of the treatment. Motor symptoms remained stable, with no extreme changes in quality of life. 

These positive changes in the patient's affective behaviour and overall treatment satisfaction may suggest potential benefits of reishi supplementation for cognitive health.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2020.0137

Study 3

Study type: 

Cellular and animal study 

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of reishi triterpenoids (organic compounds found in reishi) on cognitive impairment in an Alzheimer's mice model.

Dose:

Animal study: 0.35 and 1.40 mg/kg of reishi triterpenoids or controls

Cellular study: 30 and 300 μmol/L of reishi triterpenoids or control

Duration:

60 days

Results:

In the animal experiment, the results found that the administration of reishi triterpenoids reduced cognitive impairment and improved spatial learning in mice. Spatial learning refers to the process through which an organism acquires a mental representation of its environment.

In the cellular experiment, significant hippocampal damage was observed in mice with Alzheimer’s disease, however  reishi triterpenoids mitigated this damage by inhibiting apoptosis, the process of cell death. Inhibiting the process of cell death can help protect neurons and prevent their premature death, thereby preserving brain function and memory. Additionally, reishi triterpenoids restored the levels of antioxidative proteins and deactivated the ROCK signalling pathway, which is involved in various cellular processes, including neuroinflammation, often observed in Alzheimer's disease. By deactivating this pathway, it is possible to reduce inflammation and cellular stress, contributing to the overall reduction of neurodegenerative processes and cognitive decline.

Overall, the results suggest that reishi triterpenoids have the potential to improve cognitive impairment, reduce neuronal damage, and inhibit the process of cell death in the brain and cells of mice with Alzheimer’s disease.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/9894037

Study 4

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the therapeutic effects of reishi on cognitive function in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

Method of evaluation:

Spatial learning and memory were evaluated using the Morris water maze, where mice had to use environmental cues to locate a hidden platform. The time taken to find the platform, known as escape latency, was measured. Longer escape latencies indicate learning difficulties or memory impairment, while shorter escape latencies suggest better learning and memory abilities.

Dose:

30 mg/kg/day of reishi polysaccharides or 200 mg/kg of reishi water extract or control

Duration:

90 days

Results:

Mice treated with reishi (both polysaccharides and water extract) exhibited improved spatial  learning memory, a type of memory essential for navigation, orientation, and understanding the layout of spaces. This was established by the less time they spent locating the hidden platform in the Morris maze test. The study also found that reishi polysaccharides reduced cognitive deficits and enhanced neurogenesis (the process of generating new neurons, which is involved in functions such as learning, memory, and the brain's ability to adapt and think flexibly) in mice with Alzheimer’s disease.

Reishi oral supplementation also improved cognitive deficits in the mice and promoted the proliferation (number) of “neural progenitor cells”, which are cells that play a pivotal role in brain development, repair, and regeneration, leading to the development of new neurons.

Year:

2017

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.stemcr.2016.12.007

Study 5

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of reishi on rats with Alzheimer’s disease induced by streptozotocin, a chemical compound, injected directly into the brain.

Dose:

2.0, 4.0, 8.0 g/kg body weight of reishi spore (pre-administered before streptozotocin injury) or control

Duration:

3 weeks

Results:

Rats injected with streptozotocin but not treated with reishi, displayed elevated oxidative stress (characterised by an increase in free radicals that can cause damage to cells, proteins, and DNA) along with impaired functioning of mitochondria, the energy-producing “powerhouses”  within cells. In the context of Alzheimer's disease, mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to neuronal and cell damage, which are key factors in the progression of the disease. Furthermore, these rats exhibited deficits in spatial learning and memory, as well as severe damage to hippocampal neurons.

On the other hand, rats treated with reishi at a dosage of 8.0 g/kg exhibited significant reversal of these abnormalities, suggesting that reishi may have protective effects on the hippocampus against oxidative damage and energy metabolism disruption caused by streptozotocin.

Overall, the findings suggest that reishi could have potential therapeutic effects in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease.

Year:

2012

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.etp.2010.12.011

Study 6

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the protective effects of reishi spore extract against learning and memory impairments in rats with Alzheimer's disease induced by streptozotocin, a chemical compound which contributes to neurodegenerative processes (gradual and progressive damage of nerve cells in the brain).

Method of evaluation: 

Learning and memory abilities in mice were evaluated using the Morris water maze, a task in which mice had to use environmental cues to locate a hidden platform. The time taken to find the platform, known as escape latency, was measured. Longer escape latencies indicate learning difficulties or memory impairment, while shorter escape latencies suggest better learning and memory abilities.

Dose:

360 and 720 mg/kg of reishi spore extract or control 

Duration:

21 days (14 days of reishi treatment)

Results:

The study found that treatment with reishi spore extract significantly improved memory in rats with Alzheimer's disease. Reishi spore extract reversed the increases in proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease (Amyloid β and Tau proteins) and restored levels of neurotrophic factors (often called 'growth factors' for neurons) in the hippocampus, a region of the brain known for its crucial role in memory, learning, and emotional regulation.

Furthermore, based on the Morris water maze test, rats treated with reishi extract demonstrated shorter latencies in reaching the hidden platform compared to the control group. Shorter escape latencies indicate improved learning and memory abilities.

Overall, the study highlights the potential of reishi spore extract to enhance memory, improve protein imbalances associated with Alzheimer's disease, and restore neurotrophic signalling in the hippocampus (the communication system in the brain's memory centre), suggesting a potential benefit for addressing cognitive deficits.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2020.113725

Study 7

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effect of reishi on memory and learning tasks in male mice with memory impairment.

Dose:

150 and 300 mg/kg of reishi ethanol extract or 0.1 mg/kg of physostigmine (a commercial drug used to treat conditions related to disruptions in the normal balance of neurotransmitters in the brain) or controls

Duration:

11 days 

Results:

Results from the learning and memory tests found that mice treated with reishi extract demonstrated improved learning and memory compared to control mice.  The effects were more significant at the higher dose of 300 mg/kg compared to 150 mg/kg.

In addition, the activity of acetylcholinesterase (an enzyme that breaks down the neurotransmitter acetylcholine) in the brain was significantly increased in the control group, but was significantly reduced when reishi extract or physostigmine were administered. Certain medications used to address conditions like Alzheimer's disease function by inhibiting acetylcholinesterase activity, thereby increasing brain acetylcholine levels and potentially enhancing memory and cognitive functions in affected individuals.

Overall, the study revealed that reishi may have nootropic effects, improving thinking, learning, and memory.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1186/s40816-019-0101-7

Study 8

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of long-term supplementation with reishi triterpenoids (an organic compound found in reishi) on age-associated brain decline in two Alzheimer's mice models.

Dose:

25 or 100 mg/kg/day of reishi triterpenoids or ganodenic acid A (a specific compound, a “triterpenoid”, from reishi) or controls.

Duration:

10 months

Results:

The study found that the long-term treatment with reishi triterpenoids improved age-associated brain decline in normal ageing mice. The researchers also noticed that reishi treatment increased the activity (expression) of proteins that play a role in cleaning up damaged components within cells (a process called autophagy). This helps to clear accumulations and clumpings of misfolded proteins in the brain, a prominent feature of neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer’s, potentially slowing the progression of these diseases. 

Ganoderic acid A, a reishi triterpenoid, was found to be potentially effective in improving brain function in the mice model of Alzheimer's Disease, which suggests promising avenues for improving cognitive health.

Year:

2021 

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2021.628860

Study 9

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of reishi extract on the behavioural responses of mice with behavioural disorders induced by alcohol. 

Method of evaluation: 

In this study, the behavioural responses and memory abilities of mice were assessed using four behavioural tests that measured the mice's motor performance, anxiety- and depression-like symptoms.

Dose:

300 mg/kg/day of reishi extract or control (distilled water) 

Duration:

3 days 

Results:

The study discovered that reishi extract helped alleviate behavioural disorders induced by alcohol in mice. This included reducing anxiety and depression-like symptoms, enhancing short-term memory, and boosting motor performance. Resihi aqueous extract also improved the animals' REDOX balance, indicating its antioxidant properties. REDOX balance involves maintaining equilibrium between harmful molecules that can damage cells (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species) and protective molecules that prevent this damage (antioxidants). Excessive or chronic alcohol intake often disrupts the redox balance in the body. Overall, the findings highlight the potential of reishi extract in reducing alcohol-induced behavioural and oxidative disturbances.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/2497845

Study 10

Study type: 

Cellular study

Purpose:

To investigate the neuroprotective effects of reishi polysaccharides against oxidative stress-induced brain cell death (neuronal apoptosis). Oxidative stress is a state of imbalance between the production of reactive oxygen species (harmful molecules) and the body's ability to counteract their harmful effects. When cells are exposed to oxidative stress, they undergo cell death (apoptosis), which can lead to tissue damage and disease. Many studies have found that Alzheimer's disease is associated with brain cell death (neuronal apoptosis), contributing to the cognitive and memory problems seen in Alzheimer's patients.

Dose:

0.5 g, 2 g, or 5 g of reishi per 100 mL solution

Results:

Reishi polysaccharides were found to inhibit cell death (apoptosis) in cerebellar granule cells (neurons located in a part of the brain called the cerebellum) that were exposed to hydrogen peroxide, a common trigger of oxidative stress. Treatment with reishi polysaccharides reduced the activity (the expression) of proteins linked to cell death. Reishi polysaccharides also promoted the production of the Bcl-2 protein, which prevents cell death (a so-called “an anti-apoptotic” protein). The findings provide new insights into the neuroprotective mechanisms of reishi and support its potential use in treating neurodegenerative diseases involving oxidative stress. 

Year:

2017

Link:

https://doi.org/10.4103/1673-5374.208590

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of reishi extract on the behavioural responses of mice with behavioural disorders induced by alcohol. 

Method of evaluation: 

In this study, the behavioural responses and memory abilities of mice were assessed using four behavioural tests that measured the mice's motor performance, anxiety- and depression-like symptoms.

Dose:

300 mg/kg/day of reishi extract or control (distilled water) 

Duration:

3 days 

Results:

The study discovered that reishi extract helped alleviate behavioural disorders induced by alcohol in mice. This included reducing anxiety and depression-like symptoms, enhancing short-term memory, and boosting motor performance. Resihi aqueous extract also improved the animals' REDOX balance, indicating its antioxidant properties. REDOX balance involves maintaining equilibrium between harmful molecules that can damage cells (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species) and protective molecules that prevent this damage (antioxidants). Excessive or chronic alcohol intake often disrupts the redox balance in the body. Overall, the findings highlight the potential of reishi extract in reducing alcohol-induced behavioural and oxidative disturbances.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2020/2497845

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the antidepressant effect of reishi in rats.

Method of evaluation:

Anxiety and antidepressant-like responses in rats were evaluated through various behavioural tests, which included the open-field test, forced swimming test, elevated plus maze, contextual fear-conditioning, and head-twitch test. The open-field test quantified physical movement; the forced swimming test evaluated reactions in a water container indicating mood and motivation; the elevated plus maze determined anxiety levels and emotional responses; contextual fear-conditioning examined fear responses in connection to a shock-related environment; and the head-twitch test focused on behaviours tied to serotonin receptors These tests collectively provided insights into mood, motivation, fear memory, and neuropsychiatric conditions.

Dose:

0.3 and 1.0 g/kg body weight of reishi or control

Duration:

Single administration (60 min before the tests)

Results:

This study suggests that reishi could potentially act as an antidepressant and alleviate anxiety. The observed reductions in immobility during the forced swimming test and freezing behaviour in the contextual fear-conditioning test after reishi administration suggest an improved mood and a reduction in fear and anxiety. Furthermore, the observed decrease in head twitches during the head-twitch test indicates a calming effect on neurological signals, meaning decreased anxiety and stress.  While no statistically significant response was noted in locomotion (physical behaviour) or anxiety-like behaviour during evaluations in the open-field or elevated plus-maze tests, the overall findings show reishi may have promising effects on emotional well-being.

Year:

2013

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1186/1472-6882-13-370

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled clinical trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of β-glucan derived from reishi mushrooms in healthy adults. β-glucan is a complex carbohydrate that possesses properties that can assist in regulating and boosting the immune system.

Dose:

200 mg/day of reishi β-glucan or placebo

Participants:

135 healthy adults, aged 18-55 years

Duration:

84 days

Results:

Researchers found an association between reishi β-glucan treatment and significant increases in various antibodies and immune cells. These results indicate a strengthened immune defence, helping to protect the body against infections and diseases. Additionally, the researchers observed a notable 83.1% increase in NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity in the intervention group compared to the placebo. An increase in NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity means that the natural killer (NK) cells in the immune system are more effective at identifying and destroying abnormal or infected cells. These findings suggest that reishi β-glucan may have a positive impact on the immune system.

Year:

2023

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12030659

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, controlled, clinical trial 

Purpose:

To assess the effects of reishi mushroom in patients with postoperative lung and breast cancer.

Dose:

4000 mg/day of reishi mushroom (2 x 2000 mg spore powder) or placebo

Participants:

120 breast and lung cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy, aged 37-92 years. 

Duration:

6 weeks

Results:

Researchers observed significant increases in immune response molecules - IL-2 (Interleukin-2) and IL-12 (Interleukin-12) - after reishi supplementation and chemotherapy. An increase in IL-2 and IL-12 levels can enhance the immune response by promoting the activation, proliferation, and coordination of various immune cells. This can be beneficial in fighting infections, supporting cancer immunotherapy, and maintaining immune system balance. The researchers also observed a notable decrease in immune-suppressive molecules. 

Overall, the results indicate that reishi mushroom combined with chemotherapy may positively impact the immune system by boosting beneficial immune cells and reducing those that hinder immune function.

With the exception of slight discomfort (such as a dry mouth), no serious adverse effects were observed during the study.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1007/s12094-020-02547-9

Study 3

Study type: 

Single-arm, clinical trial (uncontrolled)

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of the polysaccharides extracted from reishi mushroom on the immune function in patients with advanced-stage cancer.

Dose:

1800 mg/day of reishi mushroom extract (3 x 600 mg capsules with 25% polysaccharides)

Participants:

30 patients with advanced-stage cancer, aged 31-77 years

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

Researchers observed significant increases in the levels of cytokines (IL-2, IL-6, IFN-g) after reishi supplementation. Cytokines are small proteins that play essential roles in the body’s immune system. Higher levels of these cytokines strengthen the immune system, enhancing the body's ability to fight infections, regulate inflammation, and support overall immune system functioning.

The researchers also observed a notable rise in a type of immune cell called CD56+ cells, which are known to play a role in fighting infections and cancer. Natural killer (NK) cells also became more active, which are specialised in killing harmful cells.

These findings suggest that reishi mushroom treatment may have beneficial effects on the immune system and could potentially enhance the body's ability to defend against diseases.

Year:

2003

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1081/imm-120022979

Study 4

Study type: 

Cellular study (in-vitro)

Purpose:

To assess the protective effects of reishi polysaccharides against  lymphocyte suppression caused by plasma from lung cancer patients. Lymphocyte suppression refers to a condition where the body's immune cells, known as lymphocytes, are decreased in their numbers or activity, which can weaken the immune system's ability to fight off infections and diseases.

Dose:

0.2, 0.8, 3.2, and 12.8 micrograms/mL

Participants:

Blood was collected from 12 lung cancer patients with an average age of 57 years. 

Results:

Blood plasma (the liquid part of blood) from patients with lung cancer was found to have a suppressing effect on lymphocyte proliferation (lymphocyte multiplication), which weakens the immune system. Additionally, the plasma showed reduced activity of certain proteins that are crucial for the immune system to fight cancer cells effectively.

However, these effects were partially or fully reversed after the addition of reishi polysaccharides. These findings suggest that reishi polysaccharides may help counteract the immune suppressive effects in lung cancer patients.

Year:

2014

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1159/000356669

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 

Purpose:

To assess the effects of reishi  polysaccharide extract on patients with a condition called neurasthenia, which is characterised by chronic fatigue, mental and physical exhaustion, and various symptoms associated with prolonged stress and strain.

Method of evaluation:

The severity and improvements in the health condition under study (neurasthenia) were assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale, which measures symptom severity, treatment response and the efficacy of treatments. 

Well-being and fatigue were assessed using a self-reported rating scale which measures subjective sense of well-being and the sense of fatigue. 

Dose:

1800 mg/day of reishi mushroom extract (3 x 600 mg capsules, with 25% (wt/wt) crude polysaccharides

Participants:

123 patients with neurasthenia, aged 18-65 years

Duration:

8 weeks 

Results:

The study found an association between 8 weeks of reishi mushroom extract supplementation and a lower sense of fatigue (28.3% reduction) and lower scores in the Clinical Global Impression severity score (15.5% reduction) from baseline. Lower scores in the Clinical Global Impression indicate that the participants' overall condition or severity of fatigue has improved. In contrast, the reductions in the placebo group were less significant: 4.9% and 20.1%, respectively. 

The researchers also observed that the sense of well-being score at day 56 increased by 38.7% in the reishi-treated group compared to the 29.7% increase in the placebo group.

These findings suggest that reishi treatment may be effective in improving the sense of well-being and reducing fatigue in neurasthenic patients.

Year:

2005

Link:

http://doi.org/10.1089/jmf.2005.8.53

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised controlled pilot trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of reishi spore powder on fatigue and overall quality of life in patients with breast cancer undergoing endocrine therapy. Reishi spore powder is a concentrated form of bioactive compounds derived from the spores of Reishi mushrooms.

Method of evaluation:

Fatigue and quality of life were assessed using self-reported questionnaires, which assess fatigue, anxiety, depression and quality of life in patients undergoing cancer therapy. Blood samples were also collected during, before, and after treatment to determine the concentrations of fatigue markers. 

Dose:

3000 mg of reishi powder (3 x 1000 mg spore powder) or placebo

Participants:

48 breast cancer patients with cancer-related fatigue with an average age of 52 years

Duration:

4 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between reishi powder supplementation and significant improvements in physical well-being and fatigue. Patients treated with reishi reported reduced levels of anxiety and depression, along with an enhanced quality of life, including improvements in sleep and appetite. The researchers also observed that the immune markers associated with cancer-related fatigue were notably lower, and no serious adverse effects were observed throughout the study. This pilot study suggests that reishi powder may have positive effects on cancer-related fatigue and quality of life in breast cancer patients undergoing endocrine therapy, without significant adverse effects.

Year:

2012

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2012/809614

Study 3

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blinded, clinical trial (uncontrolled)

Purpose:

To compare the effects between reishi mushroom and carob tree on physical fitness in patients suffering from fibromyalgia, a chronic disorder characterised by widespread musculoskeletal pain, fatigue, and tenderness in specific areas of the body.

Dose:

6 g/day of reishi mushroom or 6 g/day of carob tree extract

Participants:

48 women with fibromyalgia with an average age of 55 years

Duration:

6 weeks

Results:

The study found that treatment of 6g/day of reishi mushroom for 6 weeks is associated with improved physical fitness in women suffering from fibromyalgia. Specifically, the researchers observed improvements in aerobic endurance (stamina), walking speed, and lower limb flexibility after reishi mushroom treatment. On the other hand, no association was observed between carob tree extract and improvements on physical fitness.

Year:

2015

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3305/nh.2015.32.5.9601

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial

Purpose:

To assess the antioxidative and liver-protective effects of reishi in volunteers with mild liver dysfunction.

Dose:

225 mg/day of reishi enriched with triterpenoids and polysaccharide peptides (1 x 225 mg capsules, after lunch or dinner) or placebo. Triterpenoids and polysaccharide peptides are natural compounds found in Reishi mushrooms that have potential health benefits, with triterpenoids contributing to its anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, while polysaccharide peptides may support immune function.

Participants:

39 volunteers with mild liver dysfunction, aged 40-54 years

Duration:

6 months

Results:

The study found a  significant association between reishi supplementation and a reduction in the levels of various oxidative stress markers linked to premature ageing and cellular damage. Oxidative stress markers are indicators used to assess the level of cellular damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals.

Researchers also observed an increase in the levels of various anti-oxidative enzymes that help suppress the activity of free radicals. Antioxidants help neutralise these free radicals to safeguard our health.

After reishi supplementation, there was an improvement in the structure and form of the liver, as well as a normalisation of liver damage.

Overall, these findings suggest that reishi may possess antioxidative, anti-aging, and liver-protective effects by counteracting the excessive production of free radicals and safeguarding cells against damage.

Year:

2017

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1080/13880209.2017.1288750

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, cross-over clinical trial 

Purpose:

To investigate the beneficial effects of reishi on a wide range of cardiovascular and metabolic parameters in patients with elevated blood pressure and/or cholesterol.

Dose:

1.44 g/day of reishi extract (4 x 360 mg capsules, two capsules twice daily) or placebo

Participants:

25 patients with high blood pressure and/or abnormal levels of lipids (fats) in the bloodstream, particularly elevated levels of cholesterol and triglycerides.

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

The researchers observed an 8% decrease in triglycerides and a 28% increase in HDL-cholesterol (“good” cholesterol) following reishi supplementation during the first treatment period, whereas these changes were not observed in the placebo group. High triglycerides are considered a risk factor for various health conditions, while low HDL-cholesterol may indicate an increased risk of cardiovascular problems. Therefore, the decrease in triglycerides and increase in HDL-cholesterol indicate a positive impact on lipid profile and cardiovascular health.

Both the reishi and placebo treatments were well tolerated, and no adverse effects in the laboratory safety parameters were detected.

Year:

2012

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1017/S0007114511003795

Study 2

Study type: 

Single-blinded, quasi experimental trial (uncontrolled)

Purpose:

To investigate the antioxidant effect of reishi polysaccharide peptide against atherosclerosis, the thickening or hardening of the arteries, in patients with angina. Angina is a symptom of coronary artery disease, often described as squeezing, pressure, heaviness, tightness or pain in the chest. 

Dose:

750 mg/day of reishi polysaccharide peptide (3 x 250 mg freeze dried preparations)

Participants:

37 high risk and 34 stable angina patients (stable angina is a form of chest pain that occurs during physical or emotional stress, while high-risk angina is more severe, unpredictable, and associated with a higher risk of complications)

Duration:

90 days

Results:

The study found an association between reishi polysaccharide supplementation and a significant increase in levels of superoxide dismutase (an  enzyme that plays a crucial role in the antioxidant defence system of cells) in patients with stable angina patients, but not in high-risk angina patients. Additionally, the researchers observed a significant decrease in malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress that can cause damage to the cells. Higher superoxide dismutase activity and lower malondialdehyde levels suggest that the body's antioxidant defences are more effectively neutralising harmful substances (free radicals) and preventing damage. 

Furthermore, the researchers observed a significant reduction in circulating endothelial cells counts in both patient groups. Circulating endothelial cells are a type of cell that originates from the inner lining (endothelium) of blood vessels. The reduction in circulating endothelial cells counts suggests a potential improvement in the health and function of blood vessels, which is crucial for maintaining cardiovascular well-being.

Overall, these findings suggest that reishi polysaccharide supplementation may have therapeutic potential in managing cardiovascular conditions.

Year:

2018

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ihj.2017.12.007

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of reishi mushroom extract in men with mild to-moderate lower urinary tract symptoms .

Method of Evaluation:

Urinary symptoms were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a self-administered questionnaire which measures the severity of urinary symptoms.

Quality of life was assessed using one quality-of-life question for which the answers ranged from ‘delighted’ (0) to ‘terrible’ (6).

The peak urinary flow rate (the maximum speed at which urine flows out during urination) was assessed using a uroflowmeter. This is a measurement that helps evaluate how well the urinary system is functioning

Prostate volume (the size of the prostate) and residual urine volume were measured using ultrasonography, which assesses the size of the prostate gland and measures the amount of urine remaining in the bladder after urination.

Dose:

6 mg/day of reishi mushroom extract (2 x 3 mg of reishi mushroom extract in a 2 g tablet) or placebo

Participants:

88 men with an average age of 64 years

Duration:

12 weeks of treatment with follow up on the 16th week

Results:

The study found an association between 12 weeks of reishi mushroom supplementation and a significant 2.1-point decrease in the International Prostate Symptom Score, compared to a 0.77 decrease in the placebo group.  A lower score indicates a decrease in urinary symptoms such as frequency, urgency, weak urine flow, and nighttime urination, reflecting an improvement in the overall urinary function and quality of life. 

Additionally, quality of life scores also improved in both groups during the treatment, but no significant difference was found between the groups. No changes were observed in peak urinary flow, mean urinary flow, residual urine, prostate volume, serum prostate-specific antigen, or testosterone levels. Overall, the treatment was well tolerated, with no severe adverse effects reported.

Year:

2008

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-7262.2008.00361.x

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of reishi mushroom extract in men with lower urinary tract symptoms.

Method of evaluation:

Urinary symptoms were assessed using the International Prostate Symptom Score (IPSS), a self-administered questionnaire which measures the severity of urinary symptoms.

Quality of life was assessed using one quality-of-life question for which the answers ranged from ‘delighted’ (0) to ‘terrible’ (6).

The peak urinary flow rate (the maximum speed at which urine flows out during urination) was assessed using a uroflowmeter. This is a measurement that helps evaluate how well the urinary system is functioning

Prostate volume (the size of the prostate) and residual urine volume were measured using ultrasonography, which assesses the size of the prostate gland and measures the amount of urine remaining in the bladder after urination.

Dose:

0.6, 6, and 60 mg/day of reishi mushroom extract or placebo

Participants:

50 men with lower urinary symptoms, aged 50-70 years 

Duration:

8 weeks of treatment with follow up on the 10th week

Results:

The study found an association between reishi supplementation (6mg and 60mg) and significant reductions in the total International Prostate Symptom Score (and therefore reductions in the severity of urinary symptoms), as well as improved quality of life at weeks 4 and 8. A lower score in the questionnaires indicates improved urinary function and quality of life due to reduced urinary symptoms such as frequency, urgency, weak urine flow, and nighttime urination. At week 10, the researchers observed that scores from both questionnaires were the lowest after the 6 mg dose. However, there were no significant changes in prostate-specific antigen levels and prostate volume, and no significant improvements were observed in peak urinary flow rate and post-void residual urine volume among the four groups.

Overall, treatment with 6mg and 60mg doses were both associated with improvements in urinary tract symptoms and quality of life.

Year:

2008

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1745-7262.2008.00336.x

Study 1

Study type: 

Preliminary clinical trial 

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of turkey tail in combination with reishi mushroom on oral human papillomavirus (HPV), the most common sexually transmitted disease, mostly spread through oral sex or mouth-to-mouth contact. 

Dose:

200 mg/day of turkey tail and reishi (2 x 100 mg capsules) or 400 mg/day of chicken of the woods mushroom (2 x 200 mg capsules)

Participants:

61 oral HPV positive patients 

Duration:

2 months

Results:

The researchers observed that in the group receiving turkey tail and reishi mushroom treatment, 87.8% of the cases showed clearance of oral HPV after 2 months of administration. In contrast, in the control group (treated with chicken of the woods mushroom), only 5% of the cases showed clearance of oral HPV. No adverse events were reported during the study. The results suggest that the combination of turkey tail and reishi mushroom may be an effective treatment for eliminating oral HPV infections.

Year:

2014

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1615/intjmedmushrooms.v16.i5.80

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial 

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of reishi mushroom mycelia in patients with colorectal adenomas, which are tumours that develop in the lining of the colon or rectum. 

Dose:

1.5 g/day of reishi mushroom mycelia (6 x 0.25 g capsules, three capsules twice daily)

Participants:

198 patients with colorectal adenomas with an average age of 64 years

Duration:

12 months

Results:

The study found an association between reishi supplementation and a significant decrease in the number and total size of adenomas, which are abnormal growths that can occur in various tissues, including the colon. A lower number of adenomas is considered a positive outcome as it indicates a reduced risk of cancer development or progression. Participants taking reishi experienced a 52% reduction in the number of adenomas, while the control group only experienced a 2% decrease. These findings suggest that reishi mushroom supplements may have potential benefits in preventing or managing adenomas and reducing the risk of cancer.

Year:

2010

Link:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/20518254/

SEE WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What are Reishi mushrooms?

    Reishi mushrooms, also known as Ganoderma lucidum, are a medicinal mushroom long revered in traditional Chinese medicine. They grow wild on hardwood trees in Asia. Reishi is known for its diverse health benefits and has an earthy, bitter flavor.

  • How should I take Reishi supplements?

    While it's important to follow the specific instructions on the packaging, typically Reishi supplements are taken orally either as a capsule or powder.

  • Are there any side effects to taking Reishi supplements?

    Reishi is generally well tolerated by most people. In rare cases, it may cause upset stomach, dry mouth, itching or rashes. Reishi is not recommended for pregnancy or breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before use if you have any concerns.

TRUSTED BY 100,000 PEOPLE

"Great alternative to steroids. Can't wait to see what I can do naturally."

Zac Aynsley

Pro Bodybuilder & Influencer

"Testosterone stack is great for building muscle and fat loss."

Adam

Personal Trainer

"Love Tongkat Ali for building muscle!"

James

Customer

"Lion's Mane is great for focus."

Jamie

Customer

"Testosterone increased from 18 to 30 nmoll. Love these supps!"

Jay

Customer

"Amazing gains."

Jordan

Natural Bodybuilder

"The Collagen is AMAZING for skin!!"

Lizette

Customer

"I take ZMA for sleep, Lion's Mane for focus and Vitamin D3 K2 for immune system. "

Elena

Customer

"Sea Moss is amazing x"

Maia

Customer

"Sea Moss is my new fav supplement x"

Michelle

Customer

"Improved my gains in the gym and my performance in the bedroom."

Paul

Customer

"Natural Foundation Supplements have been fantastic for me since I've started! I've had unreal energy boosts and recovery."

Rafe

Customer

"I tell everybody about this stack. Love it."

Sam

Ex Pro Rugby Player

"LOVE what Collagen does to my skin."

Sarah

Customer

"Great supplements."

David

Customer