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Chaga Capsules

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Chaga Capsules

£29.99
£29.99

1. Number Of Capsules

£29.99
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How many capsules in a 1 month supply?

There are 100 capsules in 1 month's supply.

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What is chaga?

Chaga mushrooms are a type of fungi that grow primarily on birch trees in cold, northern climates. It's estimated chaga takes 15-20 years to fully mature.

Chaga has been embraced by traditional cultures for centuries, especially in Siberia and parts of Northern Europe. Rich in antioxidants, this dark, woody fungus is believed to support immune function and overall wellness. Modern research is delving deeper into its potential anti-inflammatory and immune-boosting properties.

Scientific Studies

We have a database with tens of thousands of studies on the products we sell. Here we have summarised some of the most interesting studies related to Chaga.

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of chaga mushroom in mice with cognitive dysfunction. Cognitive dysfunction was induced by scopolamine, a medication that blocks neurotransmitters in the brain which disrupts normal memory processes, leading to temporary or transient amnesia. 

Method of evaluation:

Memory in mice was assessed using the Passive Avoidance Task, where the mice are placed in a two-compartment apparatus and learn to avoid the unfavourable compartment after experiencing an unpleasant event. Memory performance was measured by “step-through latency”, which reflects the time taken to move between compartments. A shorter step-through latency suggests reduced memory retention or learning ability, while a longer time indicates better memory function.

Spatial learning and memory were evaluated using the Morris water maze, where mice had to use environmental cues to locate a hidden platform. The time taken to find the platform, known as escape latency, was measured. Longer escape latencies indicate learning difficulties or memory impairment, while shorter escape latencies suggest better learning and memory abilities.

Dose:

50 and 100 mg/kg/day doses orally of chaga extract 

Duration:

7 days

Results:

The study revealed that mice treated with scopolamine, a medication that blocks neurotransmitters in the brain which disrupts normal memory processes, had lower step-through latencies and escape latencies, indicating impaired memory. However, treatment with chaga mushroom partially restored the lower step-through latency, showing approximately 57% and 72% recovery at the doses of 50 and 100 mg/kg respectively. Escape latencies and swimming time also increased by 65% and 67%, indicating better memory function and learning abilities. 

Additionally, the results of the study demonstrated that chaga mushroom extract reduced brain stress, restored essential brain-protective substances, and decreased acetylcholinesterase activity, an enzyme associated with memory problems. 

Year:

2011

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1039/C1FO10037H

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To assess the neuroprotective effects of chaga mushroom against Alzheimer’s disease-like behaviours in APP/PS1 (amyloid precursor protein/presenilin 1) mice. APP/PS1 mice are genetically engineered mice that  exhibit several key characteristics of Alzheimer's disease.

Method of evaluation:

In the study, the learning and memory abilities of mice were assessed using three behavioural tests.

Dose:

25 and 50 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharide or control (double distilled water)

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

The study showed that chaga mushroom polysaccharide treatment had positive effects on mice in various behavioural tests. The treated mice performed better in tests that measured their memory, exploration, and decision-making abilities. The study also discovered that chaga mushroom polysaccharide had a protective effect on cells that were exposed to a harmful substance called L-Glutamate, which can cause damage to cells in diseases that affect the brain.

Overall, the study suggests that chaga mushroom polysaccharide may have beneficial effects on brain function and could potentially be used to develop treatments for diseases that affect memory and cognitive abilities.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2019.03.033

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the potential benefits of chaga mushroom polysaccharides in reducing physical fatigue in mice.

Methods of evaluation:

In this study, researchers used a “forced swim test” where mice were made to swim to see how chaga mushroom polysaccharides affected their ability to handle exercise. The swimming-to-exhaustion test is commonly employed to evaluate the anti-fatigue effects of medications. 

Dose:

0, 100, 200, and 300 mg/kg/day of orally-administered chaga mushroom polysaccharides 

Duration:

14 days

Results:

The results demonstrated that the chaga polysaccharides-treated groups exhibited significantly longer swimming times until exhaustion compared to the control group. This indicates that chaga polysaccharides effectively enhanced the exercise tolerance of mice (their exercise endurance) and might be a potential anti-fatigue medication . 

Furthermore, chaga polysaccharides had no toxic effects on the major organs of the mice, such as the liver.

Year:

2015.

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/s0254-6272(15)30126-6

Study 2

Study type: 

Animal study

Purpose:

To investigate the anti-fatigue effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharides in mice. 

Methods of evaluation:

In this study, the researchers conducted the forced swim test to investigate the impact of chaga mushroom polysaccharides on exercise endurance in mice. This test is a commonly used model to assess the potential anti-fatigue effects of various medications or substances.

Dose:

50 mg/kg/day of 3 polysaccharide fractions of chaga mushrooms dissolved in distilled water. Chaga mushroom fractions refer to specific components obtained from chaga mushrooms through fractionation or separation techniques. These fractions may have unique properties or compositions that differ from the original mushroom extract. 

Duration:

30 days

Results:

The study found that the first polysaccharide fraction of chaga mushroom (fraction 1) exhibited potential anti-fatigue effects. When administered at a dose of 50 mg/kg, fraction 1 increased the duration of climbing and swimming in mice while reducing immobility time. Additionally, fraction 1 led to a decrease in fatigue-related metabolic parameters and significantly reduced the concentrations of serotonin (5-HT) in the mice's brain. Recent research suggests that high release of serotonin is associated with central fatigue, and decreasing serotonin production in the brain may improve endurance exercise performance. On the other hand, the second and third fractions of chaga mushroom did not exhibit any anti-fatigue effect. 

Therefore, the study suggests that the first polysaccharide fraction of chaga mushroom may have beneficial effects by reducing fatigue and improving endurance, possibly through its influence on serotonin levels in the brain.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.02.147

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To assess the effects of chaga mushroom supplementation on the body composition of mice in relation to changes in energy levels and exercise performance. 

Dose:

824, 1648, and 2472 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom extract or control 

Duration:

6 weeks

Results:

Mice given chaga mushroom had higher levels of free fat mass compared to the other groups. Free fat mass includes all body components except fat, such as water, bone, organs, and muscle mass. Additionally, mice treated with chaga mushroom exhibited a noticeable increase in muscle mass and muscle volume. In terms of exercise performance, the mice that received chaga mushroom treatment showed delayed exhaustion compared to the control group. They also experienced higher rates of glycogen depletion in the liver, as opposed to skeletal muscles. Glycogen depletion in the liver is generally considered more beneficial. It allows the liver to release glucose into the bloodstream to maintain normal blood sugar levels and provide energy to the body's cells, especially when there is an increased demand for energy.

The study also found that chaga mushrooms had positive effects on glucose uptake (sugar uptake) during exercise. Proper glucose uptake is crucial for maintaining proper blood glucose levels and providing energy to cells for their normal functioning.

Chaga mushroom also increased lipid transport in the mice. Lipids are molecules that play important roles in the body. An increase in lipid transport indicates a greater efficiency or capacity for lipid movement, which can have important beneficial effects on various metabolic processes in our body, such as how we break down and use energy. 

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu14235007

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the potential effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharide on testicular impairment and disrupted sperm cell development within the testes in male mice infected with Toxoplasma gondii (a parasite). It is important to note that Toxoplasma gondii infects cells involved in sperm production in the testicles, leading to a decrease in sperm quality and potentially affecting male fertility.

Dose:

100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of chaga mushroom polysaccharide or 200 mg/kg Sulfadiazine (a widely used medicine for toxoplasmosis) or control (saltwater solution)

Duration:

7 days

Results:

The study discovered that both chaga mushroom polysaccharide had positive effects on sperm production and testis health. These treatments also raised the levels of important male reproductive hormones involved in male reproduction, such as testosterone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. This increase in hormone levels helped enhance sperm production, hormonal balance, and fertility. 

The study also found that chaga mushroom polysaccharide helped reduce oxidative stress (an imbalance between harmful free radicals and the body's ability to neutralize them) and prevented cell death in the testicles. Cell death in the testicles is a significant factor contributing to reproductive damage, which is significantly increased by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. 

The findings suggest that chaga mushroom polysaccharide is effective in enhancing reproductive function in male mice infected with T. gondii.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2020.02.178

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To explore the antioxidant activities of chaga mushroom polysaccharide and its potential therapeutic effects in mice with chronic pancreatitis (a condition where the pancreas, an organ in your abdomen, becomes inflamed or swollen).

Dose:

100, 200 or 400 mg/kg/day body weight of chaga mushroom

Duration:

4 weeks 

Results:

Chaga mushroom polysaccharide had strong antioxidant properties in mice with chronic pancreatitis. It effectively reduced the levels of malondialdehyde in the mice, which is beneficial as high levels of malondialdehyde are associated with increased oxidative stress and cellular damage and dysfunction. Oxidative stress occurs when the production of free radicals exceeds the body's antioxidant defence mechanisms. By reducing these free radicals, chaga mushroom helps protect the cells in the pancreas from harm. Notably, the highest dose of chaga mushroom in the study (400 mg/kg) resulted in the highest increase in levels of superoxide dismutase. Superoxide dismutase is a natural antioxidant that defends cells by converting superoxide radicals, which can cause cellular damage, into less harmful molecules.

Year:

2016

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2016.03.006

Study 2

Study type: 

In-vitro study (cellular study) 

Purpose:

To investigate whether the antioxidant properties (the ability to neutralise or counteract harmful molecules known as free radicals) of chaga mushroom extract can help to reduce DNA damage in immune cells called lymphocytes. Lymphocytes are a type of white blood cell that plays a crucial role in our immune system. The lymphocytes for this study were taken from both healthy individuals and individuals with inflammatory bowel disease. 

Dose:

3 concentrations of chaga mushroom extract were used: 50, 100 and 500 micrograms of chaga mushroom extract per mL of water

Additional intervention: 

50 micrograms/ml of hydrogen peroxide were added to the cells 30 minutes after chaga mushroom treatment 

Results:

Chaga mushroom extract reduced DNA damage in the lymphocytes. In the patient group, there was a significant 54.9% reduction in DNA damage, whilst there was a 34.9% reduction in the control group. These findings suggest that chaga extract may have the potential to be a valuable supplement for inhibiting oxidative stress in general. Inhibiting oxidative stress is generally beneficial because excessive oxidative stress can damage cells, proteins, and DNA, leading to various diseases and accelerating the ageing process.

Year:

2007

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1002/biof.5520310306

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom extract on tumour suppression in mice. 

Dose:

6 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom extract in 5 ml of drinking water

Duration:

3 weeks prior to and 16 days after cancer cell implantation (intentionally introducing cancer cells into an organism).

Results:

The mice treated with chaga mushroom showed a significant delay in the growth of tumours. This effect was observed starting from day 14 after the cancer cells were introduced into the mice. By day 16, the average tumour size in the mice treated with chaga mushroom was 60.3% smaller than in the control group. 

Additionally, the study observed that mice treated with chaga mushroom showed an increase in tumour agglomeration, which is a tendency for tumours to cluster together. This clustering may lead to more localised and concentrated tumour growth, as opposed to spreading widely to different parts of the body. Moreover, the inhibition of vascularisation (the formation of new blood vessels) observed in the chaga mushroom treated mice suggests that the formation of blood vessels necessary for tumour growth was reduced or prevented. Inhibiting vascularization can be a therapeutic strategy to stop tumour growth and prevent its spread to other parts of the body.

Year:

2008

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.heliyon.2016.e00111

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study 

Purpose:

To explore the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharides on colitis-associated cancer in mice. Colitis-associated cancer refers to a type of cancer that develops in the colon (large intestine) as a result of long-standing chronic inflammation caused by colitis. 

Dose:

150 mg/kg of chaga mushroom polysaccharides (force-fed every other day by inserting a tube into the stomach)

Duration:

101 days 

Results:

Mice administered with chaga mushroom experienced less body weight loss, a higher survival rate, and longer colon length. Notably, the number of tumours in the colons of mice increased 80% in the control group compared to the 45% in the group treated with chaga mushroom. These findings suggest that chaga mushroom polysaccharides may be a therapeutic drug candidate for colitis-associated cancer.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3389/fphar.2020.621835

Study 3

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the antitumor effects of chaga mushroom in mice with tumours derived from human stomach cancer. 

Dose:

50, 75, and 100 mg/kg/day oral administration of chaga mushroom polysaccharide

Duration:

10 days

Results:

Chaga mushroom polysaccharide supplementation significantly inhibited the growth of tumours in mice. It also increased the concentration of a protein called TNF-alpha that has anti-tumor activity. These findings suggest that chaga mushroom polysaccharides may have potential as an anti-tumor agent and may modulate the immune response against tumours.

Year:

2012

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.carbpol.2012.06.013

Study 4

Study type: 

Cellular (in-vitro) and Rodent study (in-vivo)

Purpose:

To explore the mechanisms underlying the anti-cancer action of chaga mushroom polysaccharides in cellular and mice models. 

Dose:

Cellular study: 0.1 - 1 mg/mL of chaga mushroom polysaccharides

Rodent study: 50 mg/kg of chaga mushroom polysaccharides or control (salt solution)

Results:

In the cellular experiment, chaga mushroom polysaccharide extract was found to activate an enzyme called AMPK (AMP-activated protein kinase) in lung cancer cells. This activation resulted in a decrease in cell growth and triggered cell death. These effects are important in combating cancer as they eliminate cancer cells and hinder tumour growth. Animal experiments further supported these findings, showing that treatment with chaga mushroom extract inhibited tumour growth and increased cell death. These results indicate that chaga mushroom polysaccharides have the potential to be a promising alternative or supplementary treatment option for cancer therapy.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2019.10.174

Study 5

Study type: 

Cellular (in-vitro) and Rodent study (in-vivo)

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of ergosterol peroxide, a compound found in chaga mushroom, in mice with colitis-induced colorectal cancer cells.

Dose:

Cellular study: 10 or 40 μg/mL of ergosterol peroxide per week (5 or 20 μg/mL ergosterol peroxide x 2 per week)

Rodent study: 30 mg/kg/day of ergosterol peroxide (2 x 15 mg/kg of ergosterol peroxide administered by oral gavage (delivering the substance into the stomach through a tube inserted into the mouth), using a liquid solution)

Results:

The results from the cellular study demonstrated that long-term treatment with ergosterol peroxide derived from chaga mushroom at concentrations of 10 μg/mL and 5 μg/mL significantly decreased the formation of cell clusters (colonies) in colorectal cancer cells. This suggests that ergosterol peroxide has the potential to impede the growth of cancer cells. In the case of one specific type of cancer cell  from the human colon (HT-29), a concentration of 5 μg/mL completely halted the formation of these cell clusters. These findings contribute additional evidence supporting the anticancer effects of ergosterol peroxide.

In addition, ergosterol peroxide administration suppressed tumour growth and reduced total tumour count in both prevention and therapy groups in mice with colitis-induced colorectal cancer cells. Furthermore, it also decreased the number of both small and large tumours in mice.

Year:

2015

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2015.07.030

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharide in diabetic mice.

Dose:

0.4, 0.8, 1.2 g/kg/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharide or 0.25 g/kg of Metformin (a prescription medication that is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes)

Duration:

4 weeks 

Results:

High oral doses of chaga mushroom polysaccharide (1.2 g/kg/day) resulted in a significant 31% reduction in blood sugar levels in mice with diabetes. 

Chaga mushroom polysaccharide also improved abnormal lipid levels in the blood of diabetic mice.  When the levels of fats (lipids) in the blood are abnormal, such as having too much “unfavourable” cholesterol (LDL-cholesterol) or triglycerides, it can lead to the buildup of fatty deposits in the arteries. These deposits can block or narrow the blood vessels, which can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke. 

Overall, the findings suggest that chaga mushroom polysaccharide holds potential as a therapeutic agent for managing blood sugar levels and improving lipid profiles in individuals with diabetes.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13065-021-00789-4

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the anti-diabetic effects of chaga mushroom in mice with diabetes.

Dose:

300 mg/kg/day, 600 mg/kg/day, and 900 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharides-chromium (III) complex

Duration:

4 weeks 

Results:

4 weeks of supplementation with chaga mushroom polysaccharides led to significant reductions in body weight, blood sugar levels, and insulin levels in diabetic mice compared to untreated diabetic mice. Chaga mushroom polysaccharides effectively reduced cellular damage caused by diabetes in mice. The study did not find any harmful effects of high doses of chaga mushroom polysaccharides in healthy mice, and their organs remained healthy. These findings suggest that chaga mushroom polysaccharides could be a good option for treating type 2 diabetes. 

Year:

2017

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.fct.2017.01.007

Study 3

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom extract in mice with type 2 diabetes. 

Dose:

30 and 60 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom or 25 mg/kg/day of  glibenclamide (a commercial oral medication used in the management of type 2 diabetes) or control

Duration:

21 days

Results:

Chaga mushroom treatment for 3 weeks reduced blood sugar levels in mice. After 7 days of treatment, the extract lowered blood glucose levels by 11.54% and 15.15%, respectively, and after 21 days, the reduction increased to 22.51% and 24.32%.

In comparison, the group treated with the diabetes medication glibenclamide showed a decrease of 21.87% and 36.71% in their blood glucose levels after 7 and 21 days, respectively. These findings suggest that chaga mushroom has a beneficial impact on lowering blood glucose levels in diabetic mice, although the reduction is not as significant as that achieved with glibenclamide.

Year:

2010

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1080/14786410902751009

Study 4

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To explore the effects of chaga mushroom extract on the intestinal flora of mice with type 2 diabetes.

Dose:

600 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom extract

Duration:

8 weeks

Results:

In mice treated with chaga mushroom, researchers observed reduced blood sugar, reduced inflammation and reduced levels of lipids in the blood. Lipids, such as cholesterol and triglycerides, are fatty substances that can build up in the bloodstream and contribute to various health issues, including cardiovascular diseases.

The study also showed that chaga mushroom extract had potential benefits for type 2 diabetes by increasing beneficial gut bacteria and reducing harmful bacteria. People with type 2 diabetes tend to have fewer good bacteria in their gut, which is being explored as a possible factor in the disease.

Overall, the findings suggest that chaga mushroom has potential as a therapeutic agent for managing diabetes and promoting gut health.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3389/fendo.2022.1103972

Study 5

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the anti- diabetic effects of chaga mushroom extract in mice with type 2 diabetes

Dose:

100, 250, and 500 mg/kg of chaga mushroom extract or 10 mg/kg Metformin (a prescription medication that is commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes), or a control (salt solution)

Results:

Oral administration of doses of 250 mg/kg and 500 mg/kg of chaga mushroom extract significantly improved blood sugar levels and insulin resistance in mice. Chaga mushroom also increased liver glycogen content. Increased glycogen content can be beneficial as it provides a readily available source of energy for the body during times of increased physical activity or when blood glucose levels are low.

Furthermore, the study found increased levels of HDL-cholesterol (“favourable” cholesterol), while reducing LDL-cholesterol (“unfavourable” cholesterol) levels, triglycerides, and total cholesterol. Higher levels of HDL-cholesterol may be beneficial for cardiovascular health, while lower LDL-C and triglycerides levels are associated with a reduced risk of heart disease.

Overall, the results suggest that chaga mushroom extract has the potential to lower blood sugar and improve lipid levels, making it potentially beneficial for managing type 2 diabetes.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2021.113963

Study 6

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To assess the anti-diabetic effects of chaga mushroom extract in mice with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes was induced in the mice by a high-fat diet combined with streptozotocin, a naturally occurring chemical compound. 

Dose:

150 mg/kg of chaga mushroom extract

Duration:

5 weeks 

Results:

The study demonstrated that the administration of chaga mushroom extract had significant benefits in reducing high blood sugar levels in mice. Additionally, treatment with chaga mushroom resulted in significant improvements in blood lipid levels, glucose tolerance, and insulin resistance in diabetic mice. This means that the levels of fats in the blood, the ability to regulate blood sugar levels, and the body's response to insulin were all positively affected, leading to better overall metabolic health and a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. 

Notably, there was a significant increase in HDL cholesterol (high-density lipoprotein cholesterol) following chaga mushroom administration. Higher levels of HDL are generally associated with a reduced risk of heart disease and other cardiovascular complications in individuals with diabetes.

Overall, these findings suggest that chaga mushroom has the potential to be a beneficial dietary intervention for managing high blood glucose levels and improving metabolic parameters in diabetes, particularly by positively impacting blood lipid profiles and increasing HDL cholesterol levels.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.20960/nh.03838

Study 7

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharides in mice with diabetes.

Dose:

50 mg /kg of chaga mushroom polysaccharides

Duration:

4 weeks 

Results:

The findings revealed that chaga mushroom polysaccharides had positive effects on diabetes. Chaga mushroom polysaccharides increased insulin levels in the mice and improved the synthesis of glycogen, which helps regulate blood sugar levels. Chaga mushroom polysaccharides also restored the balance of antioxidants in the body. Antioxidants are crucial in diabetes management, as they counteract inflammation and oxidative stress caused by harmful molecules called free radicals.  

In addition, chaga mushroom polysaccharides exhibited anti-inflammatory effects by reducing the levels of specific molecules associated with inflammation. It also reduced the expression of a molecule called phosphor-NF-κB in the kidneys, which indicates a decrease in inflammation. Several studies have found that chronic inflammation is linked to high blood sugar and contributes to insulin resistance in type 1 diabetes.

Overall, the results suggest that chaga mushroom extracts may help protect against diabetes-related kidney damage by restoring antioxidants and reducing inflammation.

Year:

2017

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0180476

Study 8

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the potential protective effects of trametenolic acid, one of the active compounds found in chaga mushrooms, in mice with diabetic kidney disease (diabetic nephropathy).

Dose:

10 mg/kg/day of trametenolic acid (injected into the lower abdominal area) or control (salt solution) 

Duration:

4 weeks 

Results:

The study found that administration of trametenolic acid, derived from chaga mushrooms, had beneficial effects in mice with diabetic kidney disease. The results also showed that trametenolic acid treatment reduced the ratio of right kidney weight to body weight.The decrease in this ratio suggests that trametenolic acid treatment potentially reduced inflammation, fluid accumulation, and promoted kidney health. In  diabetic kidney disease, the kidneys can enlarge due to fluid retention. 

Furthermore, trametenolic acid from chaga mushrooms increased the levels of protective substances that defend against cell damage while reducing the levels of a harmful substance associated with oxidative stress. Additionally, trametenolic acid decreased the levels of inflammatory molecules that could harm the kidneys. It also improved the expression of essential proteins for kidney function and lowered the levels of proteins associated with kidney scarring.

These findings suggest that trametenolic acid has a protective effect on the kidneys in  diabetic kidney disease. It helped alleviate oxidative stress, inflammation, and kidney damage, providing a potential treatment approach for this condition.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2022/6151847

Study 9

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of chaga mushroom in mice with diabetes.

Dose:

500 and 1000 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom

Duration:

3 weeks

Results:

The study found that chaga mushroom has significant benefits for mice with diabetes. When treated with chaga mushroom, the mice experienced lower blood sugar levels and increased antioxidant activity. Antioxidants are important in managing diabetes as they can enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce oxidative stress. Oxidative stress  is characterised by an excess of unstable molecules called free radicals in the body, and not enough antioxidants to get rid of them, resulting in cellular damage.

Additionally, the lipid (fats) balance in the mice was improved, as seen through a reduction in free fatty acids, total cholesterol, triglycerides, and LDL-cholesterol (“unfavourable” cholesterol), and an increase in HDL-cholesterol (“favourable” cholesterol). These changes are associated with a reduced cardiovascular risk and lower chance of diabetes complications.

Chaga mushroom also increased insulin levels and restored the health of the pancreas (the organ where insulin is produced). These findings suggest that chaga mushroom could be a potential treatment for diabetes by improving blood sugar and protecting against complications associated with the disease.

Year:

2008

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2008.02.030

Study 10

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the antidiabetic activity of chaga mushroom polysaccharides, particularly its hypoglycemic effects (its ability to lower blood sugar) and lipid-lowering effects (its ability to lower blood cholesterol) in mice with type 2 diabetes.  It is important to understand that these hypoglycemic and lipid-lowering effects are crucial for managing diabetes effectively, preventing complications, and promoting better overall health in individuals with diabetes.

Dose:

150 mg/mL, 300 mg/mL, and 600 mg/mL/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharides

Duration:

1 week of chaga mushroom polysaccharide treatment

Results:

Chaga mushroom polysaccharides had protective effects against type 2 diabetes in mice. This was achieved by strengthening the intestine's natural defence system, which acts as a barrier to prevent harmful substances like toxins or bacteria from entering the bloodstream and causing harm to the body.

Additionally, treatment with chaga mushroom resulted in changes in the gut bacteria composition, specifically an increase in Firmicutes bacteria, which play various roles in our bodies, including aiding in digestion, supporting the immune system, and producing certain vitamins.  The administration of chaga mushroom polysaccharides also showed a dose-dependent effect in reducing blood sugar levels in the mice.

Overall, the findings of the study suggest that chaga mushroom holds promise as a potential novel treatment for type 2 diabetes.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2022.06.071

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom extract in mice with liver injuries. 

Dose:

200 mg/kg/day of orally administered chaga mushroom extract or control (saltwater solution)

Duration:

8 weeks (4 weeks of chaga mushroom treatment)

Results:

The study revealed that microcystin-leucine arginine exposure, a specific type of toxin which can cause liver damage in mice, caused a significant decrease in the body weight of mice. However, treatment with chaga mushroom extract restored their body weight to a level similar to the control group. The mice exposed to microcystin-leucine arginine also showed elevated levels of liver damage markers which indicate potential liver dysfunction or injury. When treated with chaga mushroom extract, the levels of these markers returned to normal, indicating healthy liver function.

Furthermore, the microcystin-leucine arginine-exposed mice exhibited reduced levels of glutathione, an important antioxidant. However, chaga mushroom treatment effectively restored the glutathione levels to normal. Lower levels of glutathione indicate a decrease in the body's ability to protect cells from damage.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.crphar.2022.100118

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To explore the protective effects and mechanism of chaga mushroom polysaccharide in mice with liver injury caused by Toxoplasma gondii infection. It is important to note that the liver is an important site for the reproduction of the parasite Toxoplasma gondii and this process can lead to changes in liver function and disrupt its normal activities.

Dose:

100, 200, and 400 mg/kg of chaga mushroom polysaccharide or 200 mg/kg of Sulfadiazine (a widely used medicine for toxoplasmosis, which is a parasitic infection with Toxoplasma gondii) or control (saltwater solution)

Duration:

7 days

Results:

The results of the study indicate that chaga mushroom polysaccharides have protective effects in mice with liver injury caused by Toxoplasma gondii. Treatment with chaga mushroom led to a decrease in liver damage and oxidative stress markers. A  decrease in oxidative stress markers indicates a reduction in the level of damage caused by harmful molecules in the body, suggesting a more balanced and healthier state. Additionally, chaga mushroom polysaccharides improved liver damage caused by Toxoplasma gondii and reduced the levels of inflammatory cytokines, which are proteins that help coordinate immune responses and inflammation. This reduction in inflammatory cytokines signifies a decrease in inflammation.

Overall, chaga mushroom polysaccharides show potential to protect the liver against damage caused by Toxoplasma gondii.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ijbiomac.2018.11.114

Study 3

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of chaga mushroom and its compounds in mice with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NAFLD is commonly associated with factors like obesity, insulin resistance, metabolic syndrome, and poor dietary habits. 

Dose:

100 and 200 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom or control (normal chow diet, , which refers to the standard diet given to laboratory rodents)

Results:

The study revealed that chaga mushroom and its active compounds, including inotodiol, lanosterol, and trametenolic acid, had beneficial effects in reducing fat buildup in the livers of the mice. These compounds also reduced the activity of genes responsible for producing fat. Since excessive fat accumulation in the liver can lead to inflammation and liver damage, the findings suggest that chaga mushroom and its compounds hold promise as potential treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) by targeting specific molecular pathways involved in fat metabolism.

Year:

2022

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ejphar.2022.174841

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the cardioprotective effect of chaga mushroom extract against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats. Myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury refers to the damage that occurs to the heart muscle when blood flow is temporarily restricted (ischemia) and then restored (reperfusion). 

Dose:

150, 300, and 600 mg/kg of chaga mushroom extract 

Duration:

7 days

Results:

The study demonstrated that treatment with chaga mushroom extract improved cardiac function and reduced the size of heart tissue damage (infarct size). Additionally, pretreatment with chaga mushroom extract increased the activity of protective enzymes and the production of a protein called SIRT1, which helps regulate cell health. It also reduced the levels of proteins associated with cellular stress and cell death. Chaga mushroom extract also prevented cell death caused by stress in heart muscle cells (cardiomyocytes). Reducing cell death in the heart tissue can be beneficial for maintaining heart health and preventing heart damage. These findings indicate that chaga mushroom extract has the potential to be a treatment option for cardiovascular diseases.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3892/mmr.2020.11716

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharides in mice with colitis (a condition where the colon becomes inflamed, leading to symptoms such as abdominal pain, diarrhoea, and sometimes rectal bleeding). 

Dose:

100, 200, 300 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharides 

Duration:

43 days

Results:

In mice with colitis, chaga mushroom polysaccharides prevented weight loss, reduced rectal bleeding, and improved stool consistency compared to the control group.

Additionally, the mice in the control group exhibited a substantial reduction in colon length by 6.8 cm compared to the normal group, indicating the presence of colitis. A decrease in colon length is a prominent characteristic of colitis, representing inflammation and damage to the colon tissue. However, treatment with chaga mushroom alleviated this colon-shortening effect. 

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1080/21691401.2019.1577877

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharide on gut microbiota (the community of microorganisms that live in the digestive system) in mice with chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis is a condition where the pancreas, an organ in the abdomen, becomes inflamed or swollen.

Dose:

0.1, 0.2, and 0.4 g/kg/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharide or 3.7 g/kg/day Qingyilidan (a commercial medicine in China) or control (saline/saltwater solution)

Duration:

5 weeks 

Results:

Chaga mushroom polysaccharide treatment had positive effects in mice with chronic pancreatitis. The treatment increased the overall antioxidant capacity in mice and lowered the levels of certain molecules that are involved in inflammation, such as tumour necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β). Increased levels of these molecules promote inflammation and can contribute to pancreas damage.

The study also found that chaga mushroom treatment regulated the gut microbiota towards a healthier profile. This means that the chaga mushroom helped restore the balance of different types of bacteria in the gut, which is crucial for overall health.

The positive changes in both the biochemical markers and the gut bacteria suggest that chaga mushroom treatment could be effective in improving chronic pancreatitis and gut microbiota.

Year:

2017

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1186/s13568-017-0341-1

Study 3

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom on acute colitis (inflammation of the colon) in mice. 

Dose:

100 and 200 mg/kg body weight of chaga mushroom extract 

Duration:

14 days

Results:

The study demonstrated that chaga mushroom extract had beneficial effects in mice with acute colitis: it reduced inflammation, protected the intestinal lining, and prevented damage to important structures in the intestines. It also improved markers of inflammation severity, lowered levels of inflammatory enzymes, and decreased the presence of chemicals that promote inflammation. These findings suggest that chaga mushroom extract holds promise for potential clinical use in treating inflammatory colitis.

Year:

2012

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2012.07.008

Study 4

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharide on the gut microbiota in mice and ulcerative colitis. Ulcerative colitis is a condition that causes inflammation and ulcers in the colon and rectum, leading to symptoms like abdominal pain and bloody diarrhoea.

Dose:

100, 200 and 400 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom polysaccharide or controls (1.08 g/kg/day of commercial medicine for ulcerative colitis or a salt solution)

Duration:

1 week 

Results:

The mice treated with chaga mushroom polysaccharides experienced an increase in superoxide dismutase activity, which indicates a positive impact on the body's antioxidant defences. Antioxidant defences help protect our cells from damage caused by harmful molecules called free radicals.

Furthermore, chaga mushroom supplementation reduced the secretion of substances such as interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The reduction in the secretion of these substances indicates a decrease in inflammation, suggesting that chaga mushroom has anti-inflammatory properties.

Year:

2023

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.micpath.2023.105990

Study 5

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of chaga mushroom polysaccharide on the intestinal flora in mice with endometritis (inflammation or infection of the lining of the uterus/endometrium). 

Dose:

150 mg/kg of chaga mushroom polysaccharide (or a control (saline/saltwater solution)

Results:

The study found that when mouse uterine cells were exposed to a substance called lipopolysaccharide (LPS), they became swollen and had an increased presence of eosinophils (immune cells associated with inflammation). However, when the cells were treated with chaga mushroom, these changes were significantly improved, suggesting that chaga mushroom has a positive effect on reducing inflammation in the uterus. Additionally, the levels of certain inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNF-α) decreased in the chaga mushroom treatment group. Inflammatory cytokines are small proteins produced by different cells in the body that are released when the immune system responds to an infection or injury, causing inflammation. A decrease in inflammatory cytokines means a reduction in the levels or activity of these substances that promote inflammation. This suggests that chaga mushroom polysaccharide could potentially help alleviate the symptoms of endometritis, an inflammatory condition.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0259570

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate whether chaga mushroom extract can inhibit antibody production and a severe allergic reaction in mice. Allergies occur when the immune system produces too many antibodies in response to harmless substances, leading to the release of inflammatory substances like histamine, resulting in symptoms like itching, sneezing, or hives. Inhibiting antibody production is crucial in managing allergies as it helps decrease the exaggerated immune response and alleviate the associated symptoms.

Dose:

0.1, 1, and 10 mg/day of chaga mushroom extract dissolved

in water 

Duration:

21 days

Results:

The study found that chaga mushroom extract could help prevent a severe allergic reaction called systemic anaphylactic shock in mice.


Chaga mushroom administration significantly reduced the levels of a specific type of antibody called IgE (Immunoglobulin E), which is associated with allergies. Since IgE is closely associated with allergic reactions, this reduction suggests that the Chaga mushroom extract may have a suppressive effect on the immune response involved in allergies. This effect is beneficial as it helps regulate and lessen the exaggerated immune response that causes allergy symptoms, leading to potential relief from allergies.

Additionally, when spleen cells from the mice were exposed to a substance called ovalbumin, those treated with chaga mushroom extract exhibited an increased production of a protein called IFN-γ (interferon-gamma), indicating a boost in immune responses. IFN-γ is generally associated with suppressing allergic reactions and can inhibit the production of IgE antibodies.

These results suggest that chaga mushroom extract has the potential to be used as a type of food that could help prevent allergies.

Year:

2013

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2013.03.015

Study 2

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the anti-allergic activities of chaga mushroom in mice with allergies.

Dose:

50, 100, or 200 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom extract or 0.1 mL of salt solution (control)

Duration:

11 days (5 consecutive days of treatment, starting on day 7 of the experiment)

Results:

Chaga mushroom extract regulated the balance between proteins called Th1 and Th2 cytokines. Achieving a proper balance between Th1 and Th2 cytokines is crucial for maintaining a well-functioning immune system and protection against various pathogens. 

Furthermore, the study found that chaga mushroom extract reduced the production of nitric oxide and tumour necrosis factor, which indicates a potential reduction in inflammation.

Overall, the results suggest that chaga mushroom extract may have anti-allergic and anti-inflammatory properties, making it a potential option for managing allergic reactions and inflammation.

Year:

2011

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jep.2011.07.024

Study 3

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To compare the anti-allergic effects between inotodiol, a compound found in chaga mushroom, and raw chaga mushroom in mice with food allergies. 

Dose:

20 mg/kg of inotodiol or 320 mg/kg of raw chaga mushroom or 10 mg/kg of Dexamethasone (a common medication to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system)

Duration:

1-4 days

Results:

In mice with food allergies, inotodiol had a significant positive impact on allergy symptoms and inflammation in the small intestine.

Inotodiol specifically targeted and inhibited the function of a type of cell called mast cells. When mast cell function is inhibited, it can lead to a decrease in the release of inflammatory mediators (substances that  promote and regulate the inflammation process) such as histamine, which can help alleviate allergic symptoms and reduce inflammation. The strong anti-allergic effects and selective action of inotodiol on mast cells make it a promising therapeutic option for food allergies.

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1016/j.intimp.2020.106244

Study 1

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To assess the effects of chaga mushroom extract in obese mice.

Dose:

1000 mg/kg/day of chaga mushroom extract or control (water)

Additional intervention:

A high fat diet consisting of 18% fat, 20% carbohydrate, 3% egg, and 59% normal diet

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

Chaga mushroom extract for 12 weeks reduced the accumulation of fat in the body. This is accompanied by lowered levels of free fatty acids, triglycerides, and total cholesterol in the blood, liver, and fat tissue. Obesity is often associated with increased levels of these lipid markers, which can lead to health issues like insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Therefore, the reduction in these lipid markers suggests improved lipid regulation and may be beneficial for managing obesity-related health risks. Overall, chaga mushroom extract shows promise as a potential anti-obesity agent.

Year:

2015

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1093/abbs/gmv073

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How to use

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    Up to four capsules per day

    Take one to four 500mg capsules daily, ideally in the morning.

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    With or Without Food

    Chaga can be taken with food or on an empty stomach. However, the impact of food on supplement absorption is often unpredictable as different compounds within food can interact with the supplement in different ways.

    On the other hand, taking Chaga with food will slow absorption, which can be beneficial if you want the effects to kick in slower or if you experience nausea when taking the supplement on an empty stomach.

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Frequently Asked Questions

  • What are Chaga mushrooms?

    Chaga mushrooms are a type of fungi that grow primarily on birch trees in cold, northern climates. The scientific name is Inonotus obliquus. Chaga has a black, cracked exterior and a golden-brown interior. It's estimated chaga takes 15-20 years to fully mature. Chaga is known for its diverse health benefits and has an earthy, slightly bitter flavor.

  • How should I take Chaga supplements?

    While it's important to follow the specific instructions on the packaging, typically Chaga supplements are taken orally either as a capsule or powder.

  • Are there any side effects to taking Chaga supplements?

    Chaga is generally well tolerated by most people. In rare cases, it may cause upset stomach, dry mouth, itching or rashes. Chaga is not recommended for pregnancy or breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before use if you have any concerns.

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