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Lion’s Mane Capsules

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Lion’s Mane Capsules

£29.99
£29.99

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How many capsules are in a 1 month supply?

There are 100 capsules in a month's supply.

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£49.99
How many capsules are in a 1 month supply?

There are 100 capsules in a month's supply.

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SCIENTIFIC STUDIES

We have a database with tens of thousands of studies on the products we sell. Here we have summarised some of the most interesting studies related to Lion's Mane.

Study 1

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To examine the effect of yamabushitake (Lion’s Mane) on patients with mild-cognitive impairments.

Method of evaluation:

Cognitive impairment was evaluated using the researchers’ self-developed cognitive assessment tool. It consisted of verbal questions and tasks that assess memory, attention, language, and visual-motor skills, providing a score that helps identify potential cognitive impairments.

Dose:

1000 mg/day (4 x 250 mg containing 96% lion’s mane) or placebo 

Participants:

29 men and women aged 50 to 80 years old

Duration:

16 weeks

Results:

The study found an association between 1000mg of lion’s mane intake and a significant increase in cognitive function at weeks 8, 12, and 16 of the trial. The researchers also observed that the cognitive function of 71.4% of participants in the lion's mane group improved significantly, compared to only 6.6% in the placebo group. The cognitive function remained unchanged in the majority of the placebo group (86.7%) after 6 weeks, compared to only 1 participant (6.7%) in the Lion's mane group. No adverse effects of lion's mane were reported.

Year:

2009

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1002/ptr.2634

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of Hericium erinaceus (Lion’s mane) capsules on patients with mild Alzheimer’s Disease.

Method of Evaluation:

Treatment effects in patients with mild-to-moderate dementia were measured using four cognitive assessment questionnaires. Researchers also assessed participants' vision, as multiple studies have found a correlation between visual problems and various degrees of cognitive decline. Vision was assessed using a Pelli-Robson chart and a Snellen eye chart (a chart with different-sized letters that helps measure how well you can see from a distance). Researchers also used magnetic resonance imaging to evaluate brain white matter, as brain white matter plays a crucial role in brain function, and changes in white matter integrity (the condition of nerve fibres) have been associated with various cognitive disorders, including dementia. An increase in white matter fibre means that the brain's communication network is improving, which can lead to better cognitive abilities and a greater ability to learn and adapt.

Dose:

3 x 350 mg capsules (1,050 mg/day) of lion’s mane (each containing 5 mg/g of  erinacine A) or placebo. Note that erinacine A is one of the key components of lion’s mane responsible for the neurotrophic effects (promoting the growth and survival potential of neurons)  and neuroprotective effects (shielding neurons from damage or degeneration).

Participants:

41 male and female participants aged 50 years and above

Duration:

49 weeks

Results:

Participants taking lion’s mane experienced less cognitive decline and showed improvements in their ability to perceive clear outlines of small objects, known as contrast sensitivity. Reduced contrast sensitivity has been found to be associated with a higher risk of cognitive impairment. There were also positive improvements observed in cognitive assessment scores compared to baseline and placebo, but these effects did not reach statistical significance. Additionally, the total amount of white matter fibres showed a lesser decrease in the lion's mane group compared to the placebo group, although this finding did not reach statistical significance. Overall, lion's mane supplementation for 49 weeks achieved a better contrast sensitivity in patients with mild Alzheimer's disease. 

Year:

2020

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3389/fnagi.2020.00155

Study 3

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

Purpose:

To evaluate the effects of Lion’s mane supplementation on cognitive function.

Method of evaluation: 

Cognitive function, impairment and memory were assessed and scored using a series of questions and tasks. Visual cognition was assessed by measuring the ability of participants to accurately recall and reproduce the details of presented drawings.

Dose:

3.2 g/day of lion’s mane powder (4 x 0.8 g supplements) or placebo. Specifically, the fruiting body of lion’s mane was used.

Participants:

31 healthy adults aged over 50 years 

Duration:

12 weeks 

Results:

The study found an association between oral  lion's mane supplementation and improved cognitive function after 12 weeks of treatment. The researchers observed an increase in the questionnaire scores for cognitive ability in both the treatment and placebo groups, but only the lion's mane treatment group showed statistically significant improvement. An increase in the questionnaire score indicates an improvement in cognitive function. However, the study did not find significant differences in visual cognition and memory. Overall, the study contributes to the growing body of evidence supporting the potential cognitive benefits of lion's mane.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.2220/biomedres.40.125

Study 4

Study type: 

Animal study

Purpose:

To assess the effects of lion's mane on brain ageing, learning, and memory in ageing mice. 

Method of evaluation: 

Learning and memory were assessed using mouse avoidance tests, which measured how well the mice could avoid unpleasant experiences and remember them for future reference.

Dose:

108, 215 and 431 mg/kg body weight/day of lion’s mane (enriched with erinacine-A) or control. Erinacine-A is a natural compound found in lion’s mane and is known for its potential to protect and regenerate nerve cells in the brain.

Duration:

12 weeks

Results:

Mice fed with lion's mane showed improved learning abilities and better memory retention based on their performance in the avoidance tests. Additionally, lion's mane supplementation significantly reduced levels of a marker of oxidative stress in the brain called TBARS (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances), with the highest dose having the most significant effect. Oxidative stress may occur when there are too many unstable molecules called free radicals in the body and not enough antioxidants to get rid of them, which can lead to cell damage. Reduced levels of TBARS typically indicate a lower level of oxidative damage to cells.

In male mice, the high dose of lion's mane also decreased cortical iNOS levels. Lower levels of iNOS may indicate a reduction in inflammation or oxidative stress in the cortical region of the brain, suggesting potential benefits. Moreover, the mice fed with lion's mane had a reduced number of amyloid-β peptide plaques in the brain, which are abnormal clumps of protein associated with Alzheimer's disease. These mice also had decreased levels of 8-OHdG, a marker of DNA damage. Elevated levels of 8-OHdG have been linked to the development or progression of Alzheimer's disease.

Based on these findings, the study suggests that long-term intake of lion's mane may decrease oxidative stress in the brain, prevent chronic inflammation, reduce amyloid aggregation, and ultimately improve learning and memory.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu13103659

Study 5

Study type: 

Animal study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of lion’s mane on recognition memory and the growth of new nerve cells in the brain (neurogenesis) in ageing mice.

Dose:

1 g/day of lion’s mane 

Duration:

2 months

Results:

Lion's mane supplementation was found to enhance recognition memory and, thus, reduce cognitive frailty in ageing mice. 

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/nu11040715

Study 1

Study type: 

Pilot study (uncontrolled)

Purpose:

To investigate the effect of lion’s mane supplementation in overweight or obese individuals.

Method of evaluation: 

Depression, anxiety, and binge eating disorders were assessed using self-reported questionnaires.

Dose:

1500 mg/day of lion’s mane (3 x 400 mg of lion’s mane mycelium + 100 mg of lion’s mane fruiting body extract)

Participants:

77 overweight or obese volunteers with an average age of 53 years 

Duration:

8 weeks 

Results:

The study found an association between 8 weeks of lion's mane supplementation and a significant decrease in depression, anxiety, and sleep disorders, along with an improvement in the quality of nighttime rest. When the results from the questionnaires were combined, the researchers observed an approximate 30% decrease in depression questionnaire scores and over 40% in anxiety symptoms. These findings suggest that lion's mane supplementation holds promise as a potential intervention for improving the mental well-being of overweight and obese individuals.

Year:

2019

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1155/2019/7861297

Study 2

Study type: 

Randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of Hericium erinaceus (Lion’s mane) on women with menopause, depression, sleep quality, and various complaints such as such as cognitive dysfunction, thinning of hair, low back pain, back pain, irritation, anxiety and apathy. 

Method of Evaluation:

The participants were asked about the severity of their menopausal symptoms, such as depressive moods, vertigo, headache, heart palpitation, hot flashes, joint pain, loss of concentration, nervousness, excessive perspiration and sleep disturbances. Depressive symptoms and sleep quality were self-assessed using questionnaires. Participants were asked to rate their subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, sleep duration, habitual sleep efficiency, sleep disturbances, use of sleeping medication, and daytime dysfunction. 

Dose:

2 g/day of lion’s mane powder (4 cookies x 0.50 g of powdered lion’s mane fruiting bud) or placebo

Participants:

26 females with an average age of 41 years 

Duration:

4 weeks

Results:

The researchers found an association between 4 weeks of lion's mane ingestion and significantly lower scores on questionnaires for depression and complaints such as cognitive dysfunction, thinning of hair, low back pain, back pain, irritation, anxiety and apathy. There was also a trend toward an improvement in sleep quality although the results were not statistically significant.

Year:

2010

Link:

https://doi.org/10.2220/biomedres.31.231

Study 3

Study type: 

Animal study

Purpose:

To investigate the effects of lion’s mane on sleep disruption and anxiety behaviour in mice.

Method of evaluation: 

Sleep was measured using tests that measure electrical activity in the brain and muscles (electroencephalogram and electromyogram tests). These tests gather information about brain activity, muscle activity, and overall sleep quality. Anxiety behaviour was assessed using behavioural tests.

Dose:

75 and 150 mg/kg/day of lion’s mane mycelium

Additional intervention:

The mice were subjected to the tail suspension test for 15 min every day  for 9 consecutive days to cause sleep disruption. In this test, the animal is suspended by its tail. Previous studies have shown that the tail suspension test is an acute stressor that causes sleep disruptions in mice. Lion’s mane was given to the mice 20 min prior to the tail suspension test.

Duration:

9 days

Results:

Both doses of lion's mane increased the duration of non-rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep during the dark period, indicating a greater amount of deep and restorative sleep. In the low-dose group (75 mg/kg), this effect occurred later in the dark period (between 7pm and midnight), while in the high-dose group (150 mg/kg), it was observed throughout most of the 12-hour dark period (between the hours 3pm and midnight).

In the behavioural tests, mice treated with the higher dose of lion’s mane exhibited a significant increase in exploration. This suggests that they had lower anxiety levels compared to the control group. Furthermore, there was a significant increase in dopamine levels, indicating positive effects on mood and motivation.

The study suggests that lion’s mane mycelium may potentially help to relieve anxiety by improving sleep disruptions and enhancing mood.

Year:

2021

Link:

https://doi.org/10.1186/s12906-021-03463-3

Study 4

Study type: 

Rodent study

Purpose:

To investigate the antidepressant-like effects of lion’s mane on stressed mice.

Method of evaluation: 

The antidepressant-like behavioural responses were assessed using the mouse tail suspension test and forced swimming test. In the forced swimming test, the mice were placed in a water container where they could not escape. In the tail suspension test, mice are individually suspended by their tails using adhesive tape or other gentle means, allowing their bodies to hang freely in mid-air. The duration of immobility is measured in both tests as an indicator of the mice's level of despair or hopelessness. In these tests, mice exhibit behaviours such as immobility, struggle, or attempts to escape. It is believed that if the mice become more active, their mood and motivation has improved.

Emotional reactivity was assessed using an elevated plus maze, which evaluates the anxiety levels and emotional responses in mice. Briefly, the test takes advantage of the avoidance of rodents to open spaces, as well as their tendency to seek out enclosed and safer areas. By measuring the time spent in open versus enclosed areas, researchers can gain insights into an animal's anxiety levels and its preference for either risk-taking or risk-avoidance behaviours.

Dose:

100, 200 or 400 mg/kg body weight/day of lion’s mane mycelium. The lion’s mane was enriched with erinacine A, the primary active compound found in lion's mane extract that reportedly enhances the functioning of nerve cells in the brain and nervous system.

Duration:

4 weeks

Results:

Lion’s mane reversed depressive-like behaviour in mice. Researchers also observed increased levels of neurotransmitters (norepinephrine, dopamine, and serotonin) following lion's mane supplementation. These neurotransmitters are involved in mood regulation, and increased levels suggest potential enhancements in brain activity related to arousal, motivation, reward processing, positive emotions, and mood. There was also a reduction in pro-inflammatory cytokines in the mice, which indicates a decrease in inflammation. Cytokines are small proteins produced by the immune system that help coordinate the body's response to infections and inflammation.

Overall, the study indicates that lion's mane mycelium enriched with erinacine A shows promise as a potential treatment for depressive disorders.

Year:

2018

Link:

https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19020341

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How to use

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    UP TO FOUR CAPSULES PER DAY

    Take one to four 500mg capsules daily, ideally in the morning.

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    WITH OR WITHOUT FOOD

    Lion's Mane can be taken with food or on an empty stomach. However, the impact of food on supplement absorption is often unpredictable as different compounds within food can interact with the supplement in different ways.

    On the other hand, taking Lion's Mane with food will slow absorption, which can be beneficial if you want the effects to kick in slower or if you experience nausea when taking the supplement on an empty stomach.

SEE WHAT OUR CUSTOMERS ARE SAYING

Customer Reviews

Based on 13 reviews
77%
(10)
23%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
R
Roy Johnson

Lion’s Mane - Focus, Memory, Digestion, Blood Sugar & Immune System

J
Jacob Surmane

Lion’s Mane - Focus, Memory, Digestion, Blood Sugar & Immune System

O
Olivia
Clear head, cool dreams

I have ADHD which sucks but I started taking this because I knew it wouldn't interfere with my medication. It's just food. Now I'm listening and understanding conversations, even remembering what I'm being told. And the best part is I'm always going into a deep sleep every single night. I have dreams constantly, and it feels easier getting out of bed earlier. Ten out of ten!!

S
Steve
Been a positive experience

Giving my honest review for all the skepticals like me out there:
I've been taking Lion's Mane every day for over a month now. If I talk about how I'm "feeling" it could be all placebo effect and situational changes but the real physical change I've noticed after a week of taking it is the improved quality of sleep. So I guess waking up from a good night sleep trickles down to higher energy, improved mood, better focus, and memory. Another thing is I'm a woman in my 30's with bad PMS such as depressed mood and fatigue and this supplement seems to ease the symptoms a little.
Lastly, don't expect drastic changes in your mind, it's a subtle and gradual change but it's for the better. I'm starting to slowly noticing the benefits after a month of taking it.

M
Mike
Makes you go rawr!

I ran across a Ted Talk from Paul Stametz about the wonders of mushrooms and their potential health benefits so I started looking into what would work best for me.

I eventually landed on Lion’s Mane since I felt they provided the best potential health benefits. I chose Natural Fundation Supplements because I get my Tongkat Ali from them which I know works for me and I trust the brand.

I’m starting on a 500mg morning regimen and 200mg in the evening. From what I’ve read, you need to take these supplements for 80-90 days before noticing results so don’t expect to join MENSA any time soon.

Side note: Did you know mensa is also Spanish slang for, “stupid girl?”

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is Lion's Mane?

    Lion's Mane is a large, white, shaggy mushroom that has both culinary and medicinal uses. Known as hou tou gu or yamabushitake in some regions, it has been traditionally used in Asian countries like China, India, Japan, and Korea, and is now gaining popularity worldwide due to its health benefits.

  • How should I take Lion's Mane supplements?

    While it's important to follow the specific instructions on the packaging, typically Lion's Mane is taken orally either as a capsule or powder.

  • Are there any side effects to taking Lion's Mane?

    Lion's Mane is generally considered safe for consumption, however, some people may experience side effects such as an upset stomach. If you're pregnant, breastfeeding, or taking any medication, it's advisable to consult your doctor before starting any new supplement regimen.

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